Here’s Jamie Dimon’s Opulent, Maddeningly Tone-Deaf Christmas Card

'Here's wishing 1% of you a joyous holiday!'

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Jamie Dimon, CEO of banking giant JPMorgan, has a holiday card tradition like many other famous Americans. But unlike most of them, he’s one of the most richly compensated executives in the country. That—and a series of scandals surrounding JPMorgan—has made him the focus of resentment against America’s big banks. The card, which is going viral, isn’t likely to help.

Dimon and his family recently sent out their annual card, wishing family and friends happy holidays and all the best for 2014. The card’s panoramic images feature Jamie, his wife Judy, their three daughters, a dog, and another young man. The opulently shot pictures show the group in an expansive apartment sort of playing tennis. (Could you pick a more elitist sport, short of bringing dressage ponies up the freight elevator?) Quartz called it Ralph Lauren-esque, which seems about right. Here’s part of the photo; you can see the full set here.

7 comments
jackloach69
jackloach69

Swiss Bank Accounts .---April. -----2014.


Is your monies safe in these accounts ---- definitely NOT.

Would you get your money back if every body decided to withdraw all their accounts – NO WAY.

Economic Experts say that there would only enough money to repay 50% of their clients.

Are you going to be in the 50% --- that loose your money.-- Get it out NOW.


2012 -- - June. -- Published in Anglo INFO .Geneva.--- USA Trust Fund Investors were sent false and fraudulent documents by Pictet Bank.Switzerland. in order to collect large fees. ( Like MADOFF) ---Even after the SEC in the USA uncovered the fraud Pictet continued to charge fees and drain whatever was left in these accounts. Estimated that $90,000,000 million lost in this Pictet Ponzi scheme.


2012 - - - July. -- De – Spiegel. -- states – Pictet Bank uses a letterbox company in

Panama and a tax loophole involving investments in London to gain

German millionaires as clients.

2012 - - - August ---- German Opposition Leader accuses Swiss Banks of "organised crime."


All the fines that crooked Swiss banks have incurred in the last few years exceeds £75.Billion.

It is also calculated that the secrecy " agreements" with regards to tax evation by their clients will cost the banks another £450 Billion.( paid out of your monies.)


The banks are panicking --- the are quickly restructuring their banks ---- from partnerships --

to " LIMITED COMPANIES." ----- this will probably mean that in the future --- they could

pay you only 10% of your monies " if you are one of the lucky ones" ---- and it be legal.

ndoshi1
ndoshi1

Yes, you could pick a more elitist sport. Golf and Polo come to mind. Tennis is played by 30 million people in the US alone. Don't pick on Tennis!

JSK17
JSK17

While no fan of the financial laws that propel CEOs into such great wealth relative to the average citizen, I think picking apart his X-Mas card is a little silly.  I don't know how much those paintings cost, but beyond that I see a family in jeans that have created an artsy set of photos.  I have friends that take the time to create these types of cards on their computers and then print them out at Kinko's.  Their 'expansive apartment' could be a $300k house in suburban-anywhere USA.  What's up with the rip on 'tennis'?  You can play tennis with a $50 racket and a free court in the park - and yes I'm sure Dimon has an expensive racket and plays at a club - but the game itself is played across the economic spectrum.  If you want absurd opulence look at Donald Trump's apartment.  It's not like we're seeing Dimon on a solid gold toilet, lighting a cigar with a $1000 bank note while his wife is nearby bathing in the blood of 100 virgins.  This is just not an 'oooh - out of touch rich people' picture.  This is just an attempt to bait some controversy.

joelp77440
joelp77440

They forgot to mention that is a Jackson Pollock painting in the back ground.  That painting that he is tossing tennis balls around is probably worth more than 99.7% of all homes in the U.S.