Made in the U.S.A.

On the outskirts of Nairobi, there’s a bright red cell-phone tower that delivers coverage to thousands of the city’s 3 million people. Inside the tower sit batteries with a high-tech design and a simple purpose: to provide backup power to keep calls connected even when the electrical grid goes down. The surprising thing is where these batteries are made. Not China, Japan or one of the other big Asian manufacturing powers. Instead they come from a plant in Schenectady, N.Y., a Rust Belt city once seen as a relic of an earlier industrial age. Now a General Electric factory on the site of a former turbine plant is churning out the batteries 24 hours a day. “People can’t get enough,” says Randy Rausch, a manager at the plant. “We’re shipping all over the world.”

The U.S. economy continues to struggle, and the weak March jobs report–just 88,000 positions were added–spooked the market. But step back and you’ll see a bright spot, perhaps the best economic news the U.S. has witnessed since the rise of Silicon Valley: made in the usa is making a comeback. Climbing out of the recession, the U.S. has seen its manufacturing growth outpace that of other advanced nations, with some 500,000 jobs created in the past three years. It marks the first time in more than a decade that the number of factory jobs has gone up instead of down. From ExOne’s 3-D-printing plant near Pittsburgh to Dow Chemical’s expanding ethylene and propylene production in Louisiana and Texas, which could create 35,000 jobs, American workers are busy making things that customers around the world want to buy–and defying the narrative of the nation’s supposedly inevitable manufacturing decline.

TIME Magazine Cover, April 22, 2013

Illustration by Chris LaBrooy for TIME

The past several months alone have seen some surprising reversals. Apple, famous for the city-size factories in China that produce its gadgets, decided to assemble one of its Mac computer lines in the U.S. Walmart, which pioneered global sourcing to find the lowest-priced goods for customers, said it would pump up spending with American suppliers by $50 billion over the next decade–and save money by doing so. Airbus will build JetBlue’s jets in Alabama. Meanwhile, in North Carolina’s furniture industry, which has lost 70,000 jobs to rivals abroad, Ashley Furniture is investing at least $80 million to build a new plant. “If you go back 10 years, we didn’t think we’d be manufacturing in the U.S.,” says Ashley’s CEO, Todd Wanek.

This isn’t a blip. It’s the sum of a powerful equation refiguring the global economy. U.S. factories increasingly have access to cheap energy, thanks to oil and gas from the shale boom. For companies outside the U.S., it’s the opposite: high global oil prices translate into costlier fuel for ships and planes, which means some labor savings from low-cost plants in China evaporate when the goods are shipped thousands of miles. And about those low-cost plants: workers from China to India are demanding and getting bigger paychecks, while U.S. companies have won massive concessions from unions over the past decade. Suddenly the math on outsourcing doesn’t look quite as attractive. Paul Ashworth, the chief U.S. economist for the research firm Capital Economics, is willing to go a step further. “The offshoring boom,” he says, “does appear to have largely run its course.”

Today’s U.S. factories aren’t the noisy places where your grandfather knocked in four bolts a minute for eight hours a day. Dungarees and lunch pails are out; computer skills and specialized training are in, since the new made-in-America economics is centered largely on cutting-edge technologies. The trick for U.S. companies is to develop new manufacturing techniques ahead of global competitors and then use them to produce goods more efficiently on superautomated factory floors. These factories of the future have more machines and fewer workers–and those workers must be able to master the machines. Many new manufacturing jobs require at least a two-year tech degree to complement artisan skills such as welding and milling. The bar will only get higher. Some experts believe it won’t be too long before employers expect a four-year degree–a job qualification that will eventually be required in many other places around the world too.

Understanding this new look is critical if the U.S. wants to nurture manufacturing and grow jobs. There are implications for educators (who must ensure that future workers have the right skills) as well as policymakers (who may have to set new educational standards). “Manufacturing is coming back, but it’s evolving into a very different type of animal than the one most people recognize today,” says James Manyika, a director at McKinsey Global Institute who specializes in global high tech. “We’re going to see new jobs, but nowhere near the number some people expect, especially in the short term.”

If the U.S. can get this right, though, the payoff will be tremendous. Labor statistics actually shortchange the importance of manufacturing because they mainly count jobs inside factories, and related positions in, say, Ford’s marketing department or at small businesses doing industrial design or creating software for big exporters don’t get tallied. Yet those jobs wouldn’t exist but for the big factories. The official figure for U.S. manufacturing employment, 9%, belies the importance of the sector for the overall economy. Manufacturing represents a whopping 67% of private-sector R&D spending as well as 30% of the country’s productivity growth. Every $1 of manufacturing activity returns $1.48 to the economy. “The ability to make things is fundamental to the ability to innovate things over the long term,” says Willy Shih, a Harvard Business School professor and co-author of Producing Prosperity: Why America Needs a Manufacturing Renaissance. “When you give up making products, you lose a lot of the added value.” In other words, what you make makes you.

The Rise of the Industrial Internet
As soon as you step into ge’s battery plant–as clean and bright as a medical lab–you begin to see how it’s possible for a rich country like the U.S. to profitably export a commodity like batteries to Kenya and other emerging markets. The 200,000-sq.-ft. facility requires only 370 full-time employees, a mere 210 of them on the factory floor. The plant manager runs the operation–from lights to heat to inventory to purchasing and maintenance–from an iPad, on which he gets a real-time stream of data from wireless sensors embedded in each product rolling off the line.

The sensors let the batteries talk to GE via the Internet once they’ve left the factory. Each part of the product and, indeed, the factory, including the equipment and the workers who run it, will soon communicate with one another over the Internet. Not only does the data allow production to be monitored as it occurs; it can also help predict what might go wrong–recording, for instance, the average battery life in Bangladeshi heat vs. Mongolian cold. Designs will be altered in real time to reflect the knowledge. “It’s not about low-cost labor but about high technology,” says Prescott Logan, general manager of GE Energy Storage. The key to the division’s future, he says, is “listening to our batteries. We have to listen to what they are telling us and then think about how to monetize that.”

The approach has the potential to create entirely new businesses and jobs. While the technology in Schenectady has downsized the number of machinists needed to make a battery, it has also fueled the creation of a GE global research center in San Ramon, Calif. Over the past 20 months, 400 highly paid software engineers, data scientists and user-experience designers have been hired to churn out the software for the industrial Internet–otherwise known as the Internet of things–that will enable the equipment in the factories to talk. GE will add 200 more employees by the end of the year.

A Plant in Every Garage
A different glimpse into manufacturing’s future can be found near the roots of its past. Not far from Pittsburgh, whose vast furnaces turned out steel to build 20th century America, a new kind of industrial engine is powering up. Thanks in part to its proximity to the engineering powerhouse of Carnegie Mellon University, North Huntington, Pa., and towns like it are home to companies developing specialized metals, robotics and bioengineering–all critical to shoring up the nation’s ability to make things. But one technology being developed there may help foster a new wave of manufacturing outfits that will have as much in common with Silicon Valley start-ups as with the classic image of a factory.

The technology is called additive manufacturing, or more colloquially, 3-D printing. When most people talk about 3-D printing, they mean fun devices for hobbyists that can print plastic toys and other small objects when hooked up to a computer. When they talk about it at ExOne Corp., they’re describing something a lot bigger. Additive manufacturing involves what looks like spray-painting a metal object into existence. These 3-D printers lay down a very thin layer of stainless-steel powder or ceramic powder and fuse it with a liquid binder until a part–like a torque converter, heat exchanger or propeller blade–is built, layer by layer. ExOne’s employees are ramping up production lines to make 3-D printers at a price of about $400,000. Would-be manufacturing entrepreneurs can buy the devices and begin turning out high-tech metal parts for aerospace, automotive and other industries at lower cost and higher quality faster than offshore suppliers.

The 3-D-printing process is attractive because it can produce parts in shapes that would be impossible or unduly expensive through traditional manufacturing methods. That helps engineers rethink designs and outdo their competitors. S. Kent Rockwell, ExOne’s CEO, says one potential client asked him to reproduce a traditional heat exchanger and price it, which the firm did. The customer wasn’t that impressed. “Look,” Rockwell told him, “give me your optimal design for the heat exchanger.” The customer returned with a new design, doubtful that it could actually be manufactured. “We printed it in five days,” says Rockwell.

ExOne’s 3-D-printing machines, like a lot of new technology, will displace some labor. A foundry, for instance, no longer needs workers carting patterns around a warehouse; it can print molds and cores stored on a thumb drive, and no patterns are needed. An ExOne shop with 12 metal-printing machines needs only two employees per shift, supported by a design engineer–though they are higher-skilled workers. Rockwell envisions a thousand new industrial flowers blooming. “There’s a world of guys out there who say, If you can deliver parts in six or seven days, hey, I don’t need the machines. That’s where job creation is going to come from.” Overseas competitors will not be able to deliver that quickly or at the same level of quality.

Nurturing the Makers
The tale of additive printing is notable as much for its backstory as for its likely impact on the manufacturing economy. The technology, it turns out, was developed by MIT, nurtured by grants from the Office of Naval Research and the National Science Foundation before being adapted by private industry. It’s the kind of triple play–government, academia, industry–that’s held up as an ideal for public-private cooperation, as opposed to, say, the Solyndra debacle. Traditionally the U.S. hasn’t been as keen as other nations on those kinds of linkages. But now states are doing their own versions of an industrial policy. Virginia boasts the Commonwealth Center for Advanced Manufacturing to help companies translate research into high-tech products. To bridge the skills gap, North Carolina links community colleges with specific companies like Siemens.

President Obama has called for such efforts to go more national. He has proposed new manufacturing tax breaks, more robust R&D spending and vocational training for workers. Insiders say there are also conversations under way about how to create the kind of industrial policy–the phrase itself is still something of a political third rail–that would give U.S. manufacturing the kind of competitive advantages held for decades by the French and German economies, both of which enjoy trade surpluses when it comes to advanced manufacturing. Gene Sperling, director of the National Economic Council and a point person for Obama’s plans, is pushing a number of policies that sound more like Germany than the U.S., including the development of high-end-manufacturing research institutes to knit together private companies, educators and public resources. But Sperling says these policies are vital–and often misunderstood.

“Industrial policy suggests a top-down government effort to pick winners and losers, which is not good policy,” says Sperling. “What is sound policy is recognizing that location matters because manufacturing has innovation benefits that spill over to the economy at large, just like the location of R&D does. Policy that supports creating strong manufacturing ecosystems is not only economically sound; it is economically imperative.”

It also means creating federally funded research centers, including one to promote 3-D printing: the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute in Youngstown, Ohio. The institute, which received a $30 million federal grant, will connect 32,000 manufacturers across the Rust Belt with top universities like Carnegie Mellon and technical experts from the Departments of Defense and Energy as well as NASA to accelerate innovation in key areas of high-tech manufacturing. It’s a system modeled on Germany’s Fraunhofer institutes, which have been widely credited with keeping wages and competitiveness high in that country even in the face of competition from countries like China. This year, the U.S. government will hold competitions and award similar grants for three more institutes nationwide. “We believe there can be a manufacturing renaissance in this country if we are smart about how to put some wind at the back of the trends moving in that direction,” Sperling says.

Competitive Edge
While new technologies like 3-d printing point to a brighter future for U.S. manufacturing, there are reasons for optimism in the present as well. The American worker is more competitive than you might think. For a long time, it seemed as if the cost gap with developing nations that swallowed millions of U.S. jobs would never close. But inevitably, it does. Emerging nations keep emerging: they get richer, wages rise, and factories abroad just don’t stay as cheap as they used to be. China is promising 13% average annual pay increases for minimum-wage workers as it moves toward a consumer society. And workers, in turn, are demanding more. Witness the groundbreaking union deal at China’s Foxconn electronics company, the outsourcer of choice for many American firms like Apple. Foxconn has been increasing pay over the past couple of years.

The comparison is even more favorable when you look at Europe, where manufacturing costs can be 15% to 25% higher than in the U.S. That is one reason firms such as Rolls-Royce and Volkswagen are expanding in America. To help fill its $96 billion worth of orders, Rolls recently announced a $136 million addition to its Advanced Airfoil Machining Facility south of Richmond, Va. In July, VW’s year-old assembly plant in Chattanooga, Tenn., added a third shift, boosting employment to 3,300 for a company that in the 1980s had stopped manufacturing in the U.S. “It’s about the inflexibility of the European workforce,” says Boston Consulting Group (BCG) senior partner Hal Sirkin. “No one admits it, but you are going to see more and more of it.” BCG estimates that there will be 6,840 new job openings in manufacturing in Virginia’s former tobacco region by 2017, creating a shortage of about 1,000 skilled workers.

Based solely on wages, of course, American workers aren’t a bargain compared with workers in emerging economies; they still make 7.4 times as much per hour as their Chinese counterparts. But increasingly, the cost arbitrage done by companies when deciding where to put jobs isn’t just about hourly pay. It’s also about relative labor productivity–which has been rising sharply in the U.S. over the past decade while remaining flat in China–as well as how flexible a workforce is, how close factories are to customers (which reduces the time needed to meet orders), what kind of subsidies states can offer companies for manufacturing and how well a company can leverage all that to cope with quickly changing customer demands. Add the effect of those higher oil prices worldwide–ratcheting up long-distance shipping costs–and there are sound economic arguments for buying American.

Bob Parsons, the head of Parsons Co., a midsize Illinois-based firm that does small runs of specialty parts for Caterpillar, says he’s increasingly getting business that might have gone to China or elsewhere. “We can do faster delivery with higher quality,” he says. “By the time you factor it all in, it makes sense to keep some of that work here. I think the insourcing trend is going to be huge.”

All these factors are reflected in Ashley Furniture’s decision to spend at least $80 million to build a new plant south of Winston-Salem, N.C., that will employ 500 people. It represents the reshoring of a traditional industry in a state that had lost jobs to China. According to Wanek, Ashley’s CEO, speed in meeting customer demands has never been more crucial. “Today the expectation is that you’d better be there in a week and it had better be perfect,” he says. The company still sources some items globally–glass and mirrors–but heavy components and upholstery are made in the U.S.

Workers are expected to step up their game. At Ashley, they are schooled in the continuous-improvement model used by Toyota–known as kaizen–which Ashley translates as “systems thinking” to improve quality and efficiency while reducing cost. It works as well for armoires as it does for autos. Wanek says Ashley will reward workers who are adaptive. Part of that involves acquiring new skills while on the job and taking responsibility for devising and implementing improvements. In exchange, workers can get profit sharing tied to company performance. “If we’re going to compete, we need people who are willing to step out of their comfort zone and embrace change,” Wanek says.

The takeaway is clear. China may still be the factory of the world, but the most advanced American exporters are taking manufacturing to an entirely new level. The gains won’t be distributed evenly in the U.S.–by geography or by industry. Despite Apple’s highly publicized announcement about manufacturing in the U.S., labor-intensive, highly tradable industries like consumer electronics are unlikely to return en masse. Energy- and resource-intensive industries (chemicals, wood products, heavy machinery and appliances) may do better, powered by that cheaper homegrown energy. It’s win-win when companies can combine low-cost energy with more productive local labor and cost-saving automation technology.

“We are probably the most competitive, on a global basis, that we’ve been in the past 30 years,” says GE CEO Jeff Immelt, who led Obama’s jobs council. “Will U.S. manufacturing go from 9% to 30% of all jobs? That’s unlikely. But could you see a steady increase in jobs over the next quarters and years? I think that will happen.” Indeed, it may be our best hope for real, shared economic recovery in the USA.

Correction Appended: April 12, 2013
The original version of this story misidentified the location of the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute.

74 comments
op_shore
op_shore

U.S. based tech outsourcing companies in rural areas are competing with offshore outsourcing companies on price, quality, & convenience. It's taking off and the U.S. economy will indeed benefit

HoneyBucket
HoneyBucket

I now only purchase items with the tag "Made in the USA" 

I also boycott all of the Koch's products. 

I also support my president and the ACA act. 

SaheliDatta
SaheliDatta

It would be nice to have a version of this map where the jobs gained or lost per county were scaled on a per capita basis.

BillDaniels
BillDaniels

Whatever the economic background happens to be, to this encouraging development in the US economy, one must congratulate President Obama who has been working towards this goal since his first term; and in spite of the goons on Capitol Hill.

SactoMan81
SactoMan81

I think with the increasing cost of diesel fuel--and you need many thousands of gallons to fuel up a modern container ship--that right there could also reduce overseas production, even in China. Google's success in building the Motorola Moto X cellphone at its Austin, TX assembly line could be a preview of things to come in terms of even electronics manufacturing.

xtime
xtime

Your legend sucks !

What is <1000 mean, or 1000<?  <0, or 0?

Come on.  Hire someone that knows how to create a ledgible and sensible chart.

mike56427
mike56427

... listen up John Deere .... I purchased a Kubota tractor, made in Georgia  ... over a Deere becasue it was made in India ... 

YamilaDominguez
YamilaDominguez

"Made in USA" High quality means for us abroad. I long products made in USA I'm glad to know that companies can re-produce "home". With the support of new technologies and the legendary U.S. competitiveness, and government support, will enable a new economic recovery. This looks promising. Thanks for such a complete and excellent article.

ArunKottur
ArunKottur

can we have particulars of arms and  also........

VincentRosso
VincentRosso

i love this article it seems really interesting for my school homework's. Gunna make a presentation on it.

LarryOchampaugh
LarryOchampaugh

Made in USA means alot here overseas.  If we can find it, it WILL sell. The same holds true at home. I believe outsourcing was far more a globalist pipedream than a consumer need or desire. My next phone will be an imported Motorola X.. from the US and if Apple starts manufacturing at home, it will be my next computer. MADE IN THE USA sells well everywhere. So you CEOs looking to labor cost bottom lines might want to look at this one.....we're tired of your bullchit mon. 

HenryMassingale
HenryMassingale

This is very good a lot of companies are doing this now, and a good old fashion Boycott American Style will put us back in the game...

zoeharrison22
zoeharrison22

What are jobs created exactly? Does this account for all the jobs lost? Does it account for all the new people entering the workforce everyday? Does it include part time jobs? Does include jobs created by government? Do these jobs pay well?

It's interesting to see GE as an example of a job creator. We hear so much about why we should or shouldn't tax rich businesses etc. I don't believe GE has paid a dime in taxes in years or decades. In fact they get money from the government for much of their R&D. Eventually some of their products will be duplicated and imported from China and India. However if they were paying taxes like Obama and others say big business should would they be creating these jobs? I think not. 

ladydonnalands
ladydonnalands

Your story seems presumptuous on the face of it but your data seems to tell a different tale. I see a whole lot of white on your maps. People's lack of "trust" in this economy is lack luster at best. The government has their fingers in everything: Banking,communications,money printing,electricity,water,sewers,transportation,energy,business,home building & development,food,health,insurance,hunting,fishing and on and on beyond the horizons. Gov Gone Wild has created this massive bubble coming around the bend. Why don't you do a story on the elephant in the room. If you printed the truth about that then Americans would be in for a rude awakening. Just do it on the debt clock! It is massive.

univar3
univar3

I doubt if we ever import paper into this country. If I am not mistaking the paper industry is the biggest industry in this country and has been for many years. I know shiploads are sent overseas for a very high margin. At times this creates a shortage here in the states which drive up pricing. Next time you look at a box see where it came from by the stamp on the bottom and you will know if it was M

SkyMKinley
SkyMKinley

Oddly enough, my dad was telling me that when I was just a little kid if he bragged about buying "Made in the USA" products .. people called him phobic of foreign people and products. Its a weird, weird world.

DtotheP
DtotheP

This is a great post but I have to say that people don't really know the price of what it costs to sell American names lol. 


For about a week not too long ago, I sold Kirby vacuums and it was a bitch. Price, it was a heavy tank, and the economy in my state didn't help either. Great "product" but still too much. I get that it creates jobs here and we really need that right now and in the future but it was still too much to bother with selling at a time like this.

Onepatriot
Onepatriot

The hidden costs that we ALL pay on imported goods is the air pollution that those ships put out each hour.

To quote an article from the British Newspaper The Guardian, in one year a single ship carrying a few thousand containers or vehicles can emit cancer and asthma causing pollutants equivalent to that of 50 million cars.

Thousands of these ships ply the oceans.  The Guardian says the low grade bunker fuel used by the world's 90,000 cargo ships contains up to 2,000 times the amount of sulphur compared to the diesel fuel burned in automobiles.  New ships burn fuel not by gallons, but by tons per hour. 

ChefRocha
ChefRocha

It took me nearly a year to find USA manufacturer's to make my product, including the packaging....and it was worth the wait! (I sell baking parchment, FYI.) I could have had my product made cheaper, quicker and with a greater profit margin...but I wouldn't have the pride of ownership and quality!

If you have an invention, product idea...do your homework and research for sourcing from coast to coast! Who knew Michigan ever had a 'virgin pulp' paper industry? The things you'll learn about this great land!

mikeslaww
mikeslaww

Now what we need is an education system that will give our labor force the tech skills needed in order to take advantage of the new manufacturing jobs.

SandyMontalbano
SandyMontalbano

Reshoring is growing rapidly and offshoring is slowing to the extent that the two processes are about in balance for the first time in decades! Repeated surveys by Boston Consulting Group, MIT, Deloitte and others consistently show a sizable and growing percentage of companies deciding to reshore.

More than 200 larger companies have publicly announced reshoring actions which inevitably impact thousands of domestic suppliers. Current research shows many companies can reshore what they have offshored and improve their profitability if they used TCO instead of price to make their decision.

The not-for-profit Reshoring Initiative’s free Total Cost of Ownership software helps corporations calculate the real P&L impact of reshoring or offshoring. In many cases companies will find that, although the production cost is lower offshore, the total cost is higher.

You can reach Harry Moser, founder/president of The Reshoring Initiative, at harry.moser@reshorenow.org

DeweySayenoff
DeweySayenoff

Businesses are in the business of making money.  They will do anything to do that.  At a time when U.S. wages were high, they outsourced their jobs to other countries.  They demanded unions be broken.  They kicked millions of Americans to the curb and threw them under the bus all in the pursuit of the almighty dollar.

But in their short-sighted, quarter-by-quarter pursuit of that almighty dollar they put billions of dollars into economies that then raised their standards of living, and started demanding more in wages and benefits.  This is the inevitable result of increasing standards of living anywhere.  And now that they've destroyed the economy of the United States, they're back again to make it all better - at least until the bottom line starts looking thin again, and they outsource to overseas markets once again.

It's too bad there're no laws mandating ethical behaviors and practices  by businesses.  It's even more pitiful that businesses feel no responsibility to the economies or the countries to which they sell or in which they operate.  It's all about the dead (mostly) presidents.  Nothing else matters - including lives, countries or economies.

Not to mention environments.

People like those who run these companies (and their brainless supporters) are who will kill off the human race.  And the universe will laugh at is, if it even bothers noticing our passing at all.

atiladelmosat
atiladelmosat

Época en la cual de alguna forma desconocida todos los habitantes vivían en algún tipo de paz que nos falta hoy en día. Pero ya imposible duele de verdad

Ash
Ash

Am wearing my pricey American Red Wing boots from the company's Heritage line now.  I own 2 pairs of RW boots and a pair of mocs and am considering a couple of other pairs.  The last forever and the company will refurbish them if necessary.  I wouldn't buy them if they were made overseas.  

Sandmtnlady
Sandmtnlady

Relax some of the EPA laws and don't force unions on companies and workers and jobs will come back quickly.

sangsue
sangsue

"workers from China to India are demanding and getting bigger paychecks, while U.S. companies have won massive concessions from unions over the past decade. "

Think about that. Jobs are coming back here because our wages are now low enough for the US companies to make money. Am I the only one who sees something wrong with that?


KurtChristian
KurtChristian

We need a law passed at the national level that requires retailers to list on the product pricing tag where a product was manufactured. Not assembled in the U.S., actually made in the U.S.  I would pay slightly more if I knew a product was of high quality and made in the U.S. by companies that pay fair wages and benefits to employees.

27monaco
27monaco

How about a store that carries items that are "made in USA" only? That would be interesting because then consumers could actually see everything that is still made in the USA and "vote" with their pocketbooks, so to speak. The employees would have to be paid a living wage as well, no sense selling American made products if the employees selling them get "third world wages". A livable minimum wage would be appropriate for the pay scale in the store. The point of the entire exercise in my mind, would be to demonstrate that a) people will buy American Made if given the chance and b)paying a living wage isn't going to bankrupt the company doing so. How about K-mart? A way to distinguish your company from the others like it.

RobertNguyen
RobertNguyen

A country that does not produce anything will die sooner or later. It's good to see GE - the king of off shoring begin to realize the wisdom and start bring jobs home...

No body is buying your products, and pay tax if we don't also have jobs in the US. 

FullOtto
FullOtto

Utter rubbish.  Jeffrey Immelt, Ob*ma's protector, jobs "czar" and business partner, has been sending all of our jobs to communist China.  The only jobs here are federal government jobs, to be paid for with hyperinflated dollars.

Time.com is just cheerleading for Ob*ma, as are NBC/CNBC/MSNBC/CBS/ABC/PBS/NPR/LAT/WAPO/NYT ad nauseam.


therealdude
therealdude

I've seen a few factories where I live who've "returned". The reason why they returned is the economy of some of these countries they've outsourced to have improved, which means workers want better wages, benefits, working conditions, etc...Combine that with shipping and our sinking economy where people are now willing to take hard jobs in manufacturing for almost half what they used to pay and that's the reason they returned here.

DamonHowell
DamonHowell

Unfortunately, the hype isn't anything the American unemployed should get excited about since the way these companies can stay competitive with foreign labor is to fill their factories with machines. That doesn't spell work for America, it only makes the rich jerks richer. They still don't care about all the millions in this country that need work. The current unemployed will still be. But how can we buy American if even the shoe factory we work doesn't pay us enough to buy the shoes we ourselves make?

John.Roper
John.Roper

@xtime This is so simple I'm not even going to trouble myself to give you a basic math lesson.  xtime, you are one of those non-techs who will be left in the dust in the new industrial era.

OhioKake
OhioKake

@LarryOchampaugh I would love it if the Iphone was made here. A few years ago I did go on-line to try and fine a cell phone that was even made in North America but had no luck. I ended up getting an iphone, but would have bough any smart phone that was made in North America if I could have found one.

amauri.alves
amauri.alves

@LarryOchampaugh Totally agree! IT is frustrating when you go to Disney World, for example, and buy a doll, and it is stamped "MADE IN CHINA". If I am visiting a country, I want buy things from that coutry, not just thing idealized at that country and produced overseas. I have clothes bought In Disney World by the 80's and they are more beautiful, more durable, and the famous "MADE IN THE USA" stamp.

daena.vassar
daena.vassar

@DtotheP   Kirby vacuums are fantastic- better I would say than even Dyson.

Had one for 6 years and I believe I will have it for the next 10.  0 in the landfill, so worth the price I paid for it.

Made in USA baby!

univar3
univar3

@ChefRocha Funny you mentioned virgin pulp. I work for a corrugating plant in MN and serve a Nestle company that is in Wisc. Nestle is requiring their product be made with virgin fiber paper so there will be no unexpected chemical leaching into their food products. We get the paper from Florida and is shipped by rail. Can you imagine all the logistics of making this happen? A lot of jobs created by this move!

Ash
Ash

@Sandmtnlady ah, the old "blame it on the EPA and the unions" chestnut .... there are people who still actually believe that?

timm.dopp
timm.dopp

@KurtChristian Well that is the real problem. WE would be willing to pay "slightly more" maybe.. Like 1-3%?

KurtChristian
KurtChristian

@FullOtto You obviously are brainwashed by Fox News with all of that fair and balanced reporting. American companies have been shipping our jobs offshore since well before President Obama came to office. Both Democrats and Republicans have the responsibility to create more jobs back in the U.S.  Can we agree on that point?  Let's work together to make us all proud again of this exceptional Nation.

CynthiaAvishegnath
CynthiaAvishegnath

@FullOtto

 This is a blessed country. The Divine will refocus His blessings on us as we continually and increasingly distend ourselves against discriminating the underprivileged, and as we progressively move forward in marriage equality, but instead focus on the hardwork and capabilities of people rather than their personal traits. But such divine blessing is to the chagrin of people who enjoy inventing economic and religious principles out of thin air to justify their discrimination.

FYI, exporting low-paid jobs to encourage creation of highly-paid ones was not an American invention. It was an invention of the city state of Singapore, where they found it as the only means for a small state to survive - to force their people from complacency of stagnating their skills.

However, there are people of your caliber who prefer that this country continue to mire in unsustainably low levels of skills and education.

Your "The only jobs here are federal government jobs", either demonstrates your deliberate oblivious awareness, or a penchant for hyperbolic  unverifiable statements. Statements made in contrast to everything that is actually happening.

ShaneWielding
ShaneWielding

@FullOtto:  Have some respect for the President of the United States---YOUR president. At the very least spell out his name in full.  

CynthiaAvishegnath
CynthiaAvishegnath

You do not know that those machines actually require the same number of workers, but they are programmers, process engineers and product architects.

But you don't care because you are not qualified to take those jobs. There is a shortage of skills to fill those jobs, but you don't care because you also don't feel it is right for you to have to continually improve your skills, or to reinvent your skill-set. Born a coal-miner, always a coal miner.

So, industries have to depend on H1-B, but then you do care. You care by questioning why industries are importing workers and depressing the salary here. But you don't care that the jobs that you are qualified for no longer exists. And you don't know what your Indian-born colleagues are actually doing to care to criticise that there actually are sufficient Americans to fill those positions.

Even if there aren't sufficient skils, you would believe that we should create an artificial demand-supply job economy so that the demand exceeding supply would force wages to go up. That is a really skewed  way of reasoning - to asphyxiate American companies from getting the skills they need hoping to raise wages here to unsustainably high levels compared to wages in the rest of the world.

amauri.alves
amauri.alves

@timm.dopp @KurtChristian If you're willing to be paid "slightly more", companies start to run for poor countries where eomployers live with 1 dollar a day.... 

HelmutGrossinger
HelmutGrossinger

@KurtChristian @FullOtto what jobs does the government create? Laptops, Desktop computers, Automobiles, etc... None of the above. Now they help make it possible to repair infrastructure like roads bridges but in general, the government creates no jobs, period.

HelmutGrossinger
HelmutGrossinger

@CynthiaAvishegnath you are so right. I am a legal immigrant from Europe. I spend 21 years in the US Army but had gotten NO skill there. When retiring I knew that I had to get a skill. I decided to become an Electrics Technician and worked for H-P for 20 years. Only with an excellent Education will you have a job that will support your family. My children got that message from me when they were 3 years old until the graduated from CSU with a DVM and from CU as a Mechanical Engineer.

Lebow-Ski
Lebow-Ski

@CynthiaAvishegnath Clearly DamonHowell doesn't understand the dynamic of the article as written. The old "give me a job making $30.00 an hour pushing a button all day" jobs will not be coming back ok? If Americans want to take advantage of the new manufacturing jobs they will have to attend trade schools or college courses to get qualified. No more high school drop out jobs. They are a thing of the past.

pcook44
pcook44

@Lebow-ski


I agree with the Dude!