A Lot More People Are About to See That Pantene Ad Everybody Is Going Crazy Over

This rollout strategy was very different from Dove's "Real Beauty Sketches" campaign

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Pantene Philippines

While most advertisers launch large scale, online, global marketing campaigns for videos to make them viral, the folks at Procter & Gamble are doing just the opposite.

Last month, Pantene’s Philippines branch released a video that powerfully broke down sexist double standards women often face in the workplace. Although P&G told Ad Age that it was posted to the regional Pantene’s YouTube page on Nov. 9 and ran on television twice, there was no large scale roll out plan. Then on Dec. 7, Sheryl Sandberg exalted the commercial on her Facebook page. Ten days later, the video has been seen more than 8 million times on YouTube.

And thus, P&G is now rolling out an international media campaign.

According to Ad Age, Americans can expect to see the video promoted on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube as well as appear in searches and on Pantene’s main site. A spokesperson even included a new hashtag for the ad, #ShineStrong, in an email to Ad Age. The old hashtag was #WhipIt, indicating another change in sharing strategy for the “Be Strong & Shine” campaign.

This is very different from how Dove rolled out its “Real Beauty Sketches” video, a work that was meant to go megaviral (and passed all expectations), but had a very strong strategy from day one. Sometimes a hit takes you by surprise.

It should be noted that while BBDO Gerrero, Manila made the spot, Pantene’s agency of record in the U.S. (and many other international locations) is Grey Worldwide, which will now see creative from another team appear on its turf.

Watch the ad again below:

8 comments
BrianBrotarlo
BrianBrotarlo

Unfair to the Philippines, which is a very accepting country to women in power.

EmilyWilson1
EmilyWilson1

I loved the ad...but I thought about it and realized that these are all still beautiful, skinny people. That mutes the message a little bit, in my opinion.

gingerman
gingerman

women are not the only ones facing these types of labels, LGBT, minorities etc. face the same issues...

ShawnArscott
ShawnArscott

Feminine and masculine energies are different energies - instead of comparing them we should be learning how these energies work in collaboration with one another. When woman compete with men all we get is a  woman with more masculine traits. Time for us to understand both energies and understand that every human being has both energies. The idea is to balance these energies to become a bigger picture of what we are. Limiting us to being a "man" or"woman" has not done us any favours. The goal is to be a balanced human being. Do you see a balanced human being in any of our advertising? 

IlianaGuadalupePerez
IlianaGuadalupePerez

I am not in agreement about the so-called positive message of this commercial. Instead of bringing awareness about the double standards women face in the workplace, the language used clearly REINFORCES that double standard...I mean the negative words used to describe women at the workplace are splattered all throughout the commercial and bluntly thrown in the viewer's face! This speaks to the power of words and language and how they are covertly used to replicate a system of oppression. How about a new show idea...Mad Women! For the record, I am not at all against bringing up these type of issues, it's about the way the message is delivered. I did not like the fact that women were portrayed in a negative way throughout the commercial...it's not until the end where you see a confident woman. That's the problem. It should be fierce, confident women delivering the message throughout the commercial...not women you feel sorry for. 

scififreak35
scififreak35

This ad is AMAZING. I wasn't even halfway though when I started doing the slow clap in my head!

HelloItsHails
HelloItsHails

@IlianaGuadalupePerez The point is that the men and women throughout the ad are doing the exact same things, yet in the workplace they are perceived differently simply because they are women. It's not reinforcing these labels- just pointing them out as hypocritical.