If You Hate People, Today Is the Best Day to Go Holiday Shopping

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It’s safe to hit the mall. According to a firm that tracks foot traffic at shopping centers, Wednesday, December 4, is the best day of the season for holiday shoppers that want good deals—and want to avoid big crowds.

According to a Consumer Reports poll, the most popular reason consumers decided against shopping in brick-and-mortar stores on Black Friday weekend was the obvious one: the desire to avoid crowds. Of those who said they wouldn’t go shopping last weekend, 70% said they would be staying home in order to skip the mayhem caused by the masses descending on the malls.

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If you were among this sensible bunch, take note that the coast appears to be clear. ShopperTrak, a firm that tracks shopper traffic, has predicted that Wednesday, December 4, will be the absolute best day of the season for those eager to avoid crowds.

Don’t fret if shopping today isn’t possible. ShopperTrak data indicates that there are several other days coming up that should also be fairly quiet at the mall. Like next Wednesday, for instance, and several other weekdays going forward. Essentially, ShopperTrak analysts give the obvious advice that it’s wise to stay away from shopping centers on weekends.

“Historically, the majority of shoppers flock to malls on the weekends between Thanksgiving and Christmas,” a press release explains. “The weekdays will see stores with fewer crowds and more attentive sales staff offering shoppers an opportunity to complete some of their holiday shopping without competing with the crowds.”

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In addition to December 4, most weekdays next week (Tuesday and Wednesday especially) are good options for people-hating shoppers. Nearly all weekdays for the December 9 to 13 week make it into ShopperTrak’s top 10 for that magic combination of small crowds and good discounts this season.

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