Two Years After Steve Jobs’ Death, Is Apple a Different Company?

At the heart of the debate about Apple's future is the tension between radical innovation and incrementalism

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David Paul Morris / Bloomberg / Getty Images

Steve Jobs unveils the iCloud storage system at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco, June 6, 2011.

How does one follow in the footsteps of a genius?

That’s the question Apple CEO Tim Cook has faced in the two years since his predecessor, revered Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, died after a long battle with cancer. Cook, a 52-year-old operational wizard from Robertsdale, Ala., took over as Apple CEO a few months before Jobs died on October 5th, 2011. His challenge has been to maintain the momentum at the world’s largest and most famous technology company, following a decade-long period of turn-around and innovation with few parallels in corporate history.

Over the last year, Apple’s once-high flying stock price has shed a quarter of its value, as Wall Street analysts and investors alike have begun to question whether the firm’s greatest days are in the past. Indeed, it’s hard to imagine any executive, no matter how talented, matching Jobs’ track record. Over his career, Jobs radically disrupted at least eight industries: personal computing, computer operating systems, music, mobile phones, publishing, tablet computers, and Hollywood animation. The iPod, the iPhone, and the iPad transformed or created their respective markets, and a first generation iPod is on display at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. Jobs was named the CEO of the decade in 2009 and, for many, he was the CEO of the century.

Jobs, with Cook by his side as chief operating officer, turned Apple into a $440 billion juggernaut partly by developing a sophisticated supply chain—cornering the market for flash memory in the mid-2000s, for example, well before it became clear that technology would become a staple of devices ranging from phones to laptops—as well as by aggressively releasing glitzy new devices, even if they risked cannibalizing sales of best-selling products. As recent books like Inside Apple and Walter Isaacson’s biography, Steve Jobs, have shown, that’s how Jobs and company essentially created the world’s largest, most successful startup. The 1998-2011 period in Apple’s history is likely to become an object lesson in avoiding the so-called “innovator’s dilemma.”

At the heart of the discussion about Apple’s future now is a debate about radical innovation versus incrementalism. Apple investors, consumers, and analysts grew accustomed to watching the company unveil stunning new products with great fanfare. But since the introduction of the iPad three years ago, none of the breakthrough products—a television or smartwatch—the company is rumored to be working on have materialized. In a recent interview with Bloomberg BusinessWeek, Cook made a clear argument for incrementalism, but he couched that argument in terms of innovation. “Some people see innovation as change, but we have never really seen it like that,” Cook told the magazine. “It’s making things better.”

(MOREThe Fatal Mistake That Doomed BlackBerry)

Then there’s the question of whether Apple’s advantages are starting to erode. Apple enjoyed a head start in the smart phone market with the iPhone and in tablets with the iPad. But there are clear signs that the company’s rivals are beginning to catch up. Samsung, the South Korean electronics titan, has surged to become the largest handset maker in the world. Google’s Android operating system has racked up massive global market-share and is now the world’s top mobile OS. Still, Apple accounted for 69% of the smart phone industry’s 2012 profits, according to Canaccord Genuity analyst T. Michael Walkley. Apple generates more than $1 billion per month from iPhone sales, which account for more than half of the company’s revenue.

Apple has a winning product in the iPad tablet, but that device faces emboldened competition, most notably from new Google, Samsung and Microsoft products. The iPad remains the most popular tablet, but the field is growing increasingly crowded. In the second quarter of the 2013, Apple shipped 14.6 million iPads, down from 19.5 million in in the first quarter, according to research firm IDC. Part of that decline was driven by the fact that Apple didn’t launch a new tablet in the first quarter, as it has in past years, but increasing competition also played a role. For example, second-place Samsung shipped 8.1 million units in the second quarter, a whopping 277% increase from 2.1 million units shipped in the same period in 2012. And in terms of tablet operating systems, Android is now the top platform, with 62.6% market share, compared to 32.5% for Apple’s iOS platform.

Naturally, Apple shareholders and Wall Street analysts focus on the company’s stock price, and over the last year, Apple has shed more than $100 billion in market capitalization. Cook doesn’t seem too worried about that, though he’s said that he’s not thrilled about his company’s stalling stock price. Although Cook has taken actions to stem the decline, including a robust stock buyback program, Apple shares are down 10% this year, even as the tech-heavy NASDAQ index has soared by more than 20% (as has Google’s stock price).

(MORE: Why Apple vs. Google Is the Most Important Battle in Tech)

Apple’s Wall Street woes have attracted some sharks, most notably Carl Icahn, the 77-year-old activist investor who made his name as a corporate raider. Icahn, who is worth an estimated $20 billion, has a long and colorful history of taking large positions in companies that he believes to be undervalued and then agitating for change. Apple is Icahn’s latest target, and he’s called for the company to return more of its massive cash hoard to investors. Icahn wants Apple to take advantage of low interest rates to borrow a whopping $150 billion at 3% interest, to be used to buy back its own stock. On Monday, Icahn, who owns more than $2 billion worth of Apple stock, met with Cook in New York City to discuss the matter. The meeting was “cordial,” Icahn later tweeted, but he added in an interview with CNBC that things did get a little “testy.” Icahn told CNBC: “I can promise you that I’m not going away until they hear a lot more from me concerning this.”

Still, despite the stock slump, Apple’s core business continues to power ahead. The new iPhones are a huge hit. Last Monday, Apple said it sold a record nine million units of the latest versions during the first weekend they were on sale. In a now-familiar scene, consumers lined up for hours at Apple stores across the country. Cook clearly commands great respect on Wall Street and in Silicon Valley. Though he has yet to bring entirely new products to market, Cook has shown that he’s willing to shake up Apple’s management if he deems it necessary, including firing long-time mobile software head Scott Forstall and Apple Store chief John Browett, who simply wasn’t a good fit with the company’s corporate culture.

Cook doesn’t have to look far to see what can happen when a tech giant rests on its laurels. But the lingering question is whether incremental improvements to existing products will be enough to power Apple earnings over the next 5 years—venture capital titan Marc Andreessen’s baseline time horizon for technology innovation—or whether the company will need new breakthrough products.

68 comments
deburgo45
deburgo45

I hope you can help me.I purchased two Iphones 5 on december s8 2013. One 0f those I phones are working fine, but the other one (IMEI 35799006696827) is a lemon.I have made several visits to the the apple store here in NY. The repaires that the made seemed ok. However, the repaires were short lived only to resurface a short time thereafter, but other problems surfaced.  For approximately one week, after the latest resolution on 12/1/14, I was doing ok b ut I had to reboot the device periodically to operationalize the device. On 12/12 The Iphone failed again and I unable to reboot it. The apple store were unsuccesfull to fix it. To day an expert spoke to me on my land line but she was not successful. I must mentioned that all my encounters with the technicians were superb and comforting, but thus far I am wihout a.phone. My wife and  I purchased the phones on the same day and  the same time. In the meantime, my wife's phone never ever gave any problems and we use the same provider. Can you please help me? Please reply to this comment at email address carna54@verizon.net I have no iphone service at the moment while I am waiting for some results from Apple support!  Sincere thanks, KIERAN BURKE

PatrickManning
PatrickManning

Apple is a sinking shipwreck with a hole to big to fix, it's destine to sink and eventually be forgotten.

kevinobrienx25
kevinobrienx25

I couldn't agree more.  The new leadership is more interested in preaching about global warming or climate change or whatever we call it now.  Tim Cook is incompetent and should be replaced.  I purchased a good amount of Apple stock back in 2002 and made a VERY nice profit when I sold back in the summer of 2013 because I lost all confidence in the company.  I'm typing this on an iMac and it might be the last Apple product I own.  


I never had an issue with any Apple product before Steve's passing since then:

1) iPhone has issues with hardware and software (seems like there're trying for more updates than Windows XP)

2) Support has gone down hill and I believe they're outsourcing to India now

3) iTunes is having problems transferring music to my iPhone

4) Bugs in OSX


Apple has lost an investor and a customer.   This makes me sad since I I've been less than impressed with Windows.  Maybe I'll go back to running a Linux system.  Someone needs to step it up and fill the vacuum that Timmy has created.  

Companyinestonia
Companyinestonia

I think apple is not as innovative anymore, as it was before.. this is seen also because they started to catch " the masses" and not the luxury consumers anymore.. with their new and cheaper version of Iphone coming up.. 

Sad, but glory can never be forever.. Hope his team will do better job in the future.. Maybe there's a new star coming up? Who knows!

From: http://www.estoniancompanyregistration.com/ 

GaryDMN
GaryDMN

Jobs was very ill for over a decade and knew he was dying from pancreatic cancer, which is terminal. He stepped back long ago and Apple experienced their most successful years, in his absence. He had the sense to build a great team, which is what good leaders do.

hankf
hankf

The biggest issue with Apple is that it remains too efficient.  With revenue-per-employee at $2,262,000, it tops the list.  Apple has taken inefficiencies out of TV, Music, and App distribution.   Some would say that these industries were inefficient to begin with.  However, with inefficiencies, comes labor, which should be a standard businesses are measured by.  

With Apple employing an un-disclosed number of people in foreign countries, it manages to shield itself from having to disclose  true revenue-per-employee.

It was reported in the past that Steve Jobs was notoriously difficult to work with from some of their previous employees.  He didn't have to get along with anybody.  He just had to use Microsoft's original strategy, and apply it to a new set of devices.  Remember when Steve Jobs said to music publishers all music should be 99¢ a piece; without regard to the true cost of acquiring talent or bringing a CD product to market...?

Today, you don't need the major investment into talent, education, the capital for a studio, or the associated overhead with running these types of media businesses.  

Apple has earned its keep; however, if Apple decides to take on another industry, they should be put under legal scrutiny, and possibly even oversight.  Especially considering that many of the media companies play the game correctly, and pay all necessary taxes.  Which, it seems, was, Tim Cook's job was to setup.  Apple Operations International, based in Cork, Ireland, is a key piece to Apple's profit.  Prior to Tim Cook taking the CEO role, he was Chief Operations Officer.

msuozzi
msuozzi

We know it's bigger; we know it has much more value; we know it has more cash than it knows what to do with; we know Tim was named the most powerful man in wireless; we know it is the worlds most valuable brand; we know AAPL has cracked open China; we know Tim was invited to a meeting with Obama, representing tech, for a business leaders summit.

ALL OF THIS WAS AFTER STEVE WAS GONE............SO WHERE IS THE PROBLEM?


NZAircraftFan
NZAircraftFan

I have to say I am not a apple junkie I have never owned a apple product in my life .  I prefer Samsung for my smartphone and sony for MP3 player and windows 7 PC and laptop . None of these products have let me down OK the hardware has worn out but the software is great and never given me any serious issues unlike apple and its last upgrade to IOS 7 which from my twitter friends seem to be a bit of pain lots of issues. As we all know Jobs never invented anything just improved things which is good but I do think that people are just paying for the name maybe the should just shop around and stop being slaves to fashion.

mrbomb13
mrbomb13

Sorry to Apple fans out there, but the name-of-the-game for Apple has been Incremental Innovation for (at least) 2 years and running.  No 'industry shakers' to follow-up on the iPod/iPad/Mac/Airbook/etc..

If Apple's not careful, it could find itself replaced as Top Tech Dog in the room in easily 2-3 years.

ZonkerHarris
ZonkerHarris

Speaking as one Apple investor to another, Carl Icahn and his take-all-the-money attitude can go get bent.

firmsoil
firmsoil

Still cheating on taxes.

PacificSage
PacificSage

If Apple has radical ideas that could change industries....they are not going to tell you now.

what-do-u-know
what-do-u-know

"...Icahn wants Apple to take advantage of low interest rates to borrow a whopping $150 billion at 3% interest, to be used to buy back its own stock."

If Steve Jobs were still around, he would have given Icahn a public dressing down, no doubt.

"...venture capital titan Marc Andreessen’s baseline time horizon for technology innovation..."

I can't care less about guys like Andreessen who's really just a one-trick pony. For that matter, while he was the public face of the poster boy for netscape back then, it was actually a much older guy who did the bulk of the work and design. But a new kid on the block like Andreessen was an easier sell to capture public imagination. I would dare him to do something innovative, other than just playing the money game. 

OllieTrader
OllieTrader

They aren't building that campus for incrementalism!!

DeweySayenoff
DeweySayenoff

"Jobs radically disrupted at least eight industries: personal computing, computer operating systems, music, mobile phones, publishing, tablet computers, and Hollywood animation"

No, he didn't.  Computer operating systems didn't get radically disrupted.  Apple OS's stayed exactly flat over the last ten years with minor fluctuations during Vista's introduction.  Personal computing wasn't affected at all, for the same reason (I still say tablets are a fad and the numbers still prove it since PC's still outnumber tablets in the world by several orders of magnitude AND ALWAYS WILL).  He has done nothing in publishing that he didn't break the law to get (e-readers would have taken up any slack and are still very popular), and music had lots of other things available to play on in an industry that wasn't willing to enter the modern age.  I'm not sure what the hell he's talking about with regard to Hollywood animation.  Most animators use PC's

Jobs never invented anything that wasn't current tech.  He was a genius at marketing - which is what Apple has failed to do since his death.  Lauding Apple's past achievements under Job's iron hand is fine, because he was one hell of a salesman.  Once in a lifetime.  He could sell snowcones to Eskimos and hot wings to the denizens of hell.

But ever since shortly before Jobs died, Apple's marketing "illusions" have faded until they're nearly transparent.  The mistakes are rife: Releasing iOS 6 before it was ready.  Plastic cases for iPhones.  Touting a 64 bit processor as some kind of improvement when there are no 64 bit apps for it in a phone that won't last long enough to be able to use them once they ARE available.  Antenna-gate (Yes, that was under Jobs, but he wasn't really up to the challenge by then, and spinning it as a "it's not just us" problem was a MAJOR screw-up on Job's part, and likely one reason he stepped down.)  Worst of all, NOT ONE "INNOVATIVE" product since Jobs died.

Innovation, for Apple, by the way, has always been about form - not function.  Looks, not performance.  Nothing they've put out since Job's death is different enough to support the careful illusion of "better" that Jobs was a genius at promoting.

This doesn't make Apple "bad", per se.  It means they're just another company like every other company with a marketing division struggling for direction without Jobs at the helm.  The illusion has always been about being "better" than everyone else.  The pretentiousness factor for Apple has always been off the scale.  But it's hard to be pretentious when there are other, demonstrably BETTER and LESS EXPENSIVE products out there.  And when you're marketing yourself as if you have something "better" and you DON'T, the illusions shatter.

I expect that even Jobs couldn't pull Apple out of its dive unless he found new markets to exploit.  Wearable computing devices is one.  The "smartwatches" I've seen are just ventriloquist puppets for a smartphone and utterly pointless.  Apple could own that market if they built something that did what a smartphone could do in a watch and made it "just work".  Rumors about that they are, but rumors don't sell devices that are on par or below other devices on the market today.

REAL investors knew that Apple was all about marketing and appearances.  And they recognize that the marketing, since the passing of Jobs, has been substantially little more than putting out fires and maintaining the status quo. The "hype" hasn't changed - and it needs to.  I can lay out every Apple marketing campaign because they do exactly the same things every time.

Its rumor, rumor, rumor (most of it deliberately leaked, but incomplete information) to start with about six months out increasing in frequency and information until about two thirds of what is coming is already known, leaving the "best" to be revealed only at the "official release".  Then the speculative articles that have pundits saying "Gosh, I'll bet they're doing this..."  Then the sudden announcement of a release date, and the specs and the hype machine goes into overdrive to drown out those who look at what's coming and compare it (with increasingly unfavorable comparisons) to what's already available.  Tout "sales" only when they're good (and considering this was the first time they sold in new markets, I have reason to believe their new iPhones aren't nearly as popular in the U.S. - where iPhones are most popular - as other models).  ALWAYS make sure there's a line in front of a store.  Then maintain the hype as much as possible after the sales start in order to drown out the complaints.

Wash, rinse, repeat with the next thing released.

It's boring.  They need something new.  To keep things exciting, you can't be that predictable.  They're obviously following the Manual of Marketing According to Jobs, but the manual is old and needs to be updated.  They've lost their mojo and as I said, while that's not necessarily bad for a company, it's bad for Apple.  Jobs would have changed gears by now.  He was a genius at that.

I don't think anyone at Apple has any idea how to do that at this point.  And that's really what's changed at Apple.

lehtovitra
lehtovitra

For the user iOS7 changed surprisingly little, icons, colors and animations excluded. What has made me suspicious is the increase in the number of actions needed to perform some very basic tasks. That has always been a sign of non-listening the users, and was a hallmark of the start of decline of Nokia phones 2008-2009. Apple products have been known for their intuitiveness and should never risk that aspect.

alansky
alansky

Whether Apple can maintain its innovative edge without Steve Jobs remains to be seen, but the decline in Apple's share price is not about innovation but about the short-sighted, ravenous greed of Apple investors who made mountains of cash during Steve Jobs' reign and care about nothing except making more mountains of cash. Ridiculous!

aztecian
aztecian

ios7 is a johnny ives failure.  he knows nothing about contrast, taking an excellent interface and patterning it after a dixie cup!

brenro12
brenro12

Apple never invented anything. Apple doesn't make anything. They took the ideas of others and designed personal electronic products that worked intuitively with a very high level of design. But somebody else does their manufacturing. So we have a company that designs. Their profit margins are legendary and quite incredible considering they don't even do their own manufacturing. The question is how long will it last?

cwmelo
cwmelo

Steve Jobs will always live on~~^^

DanBruce
DanBruce

Apple's main product has always been mystique. Now that Jobs is gone, the mystique is gone.

grayzip
grayzip

None of Steve Jobs' innovations fell out of the sky, all of them solved or streamlined an emerging need in personal tech.  Mp3's replaced CD's but weren't portable; websites replaced print but laptop reading was clunky.  In every case there were others working on similar products, Jobs just got there either first or best.  It's a huge accomplishment, but he was also the beneficiary of his era.  Personal technology was upending things everywhere; there were lots of problems that needed solving.  So when lamenting the lack of post-Jobs innovations at Apple, ask yourself what technological problem exists in your life that you wish someone would crack.  Maybe there are no big ones left.  

yfcstudio
yfcstudio

First off, you are giving Steve jobs to much credit. For example Pixar. Long before he bought this little grump of computer animator a they were making ground breaking animation. Steve just sold Disney the ite a that they could make a feature length film. Steve did not come up with the tech to make the film or the story line.

Second, Apple naysayer have always complained that Apple didn't invent to mp3player, the smart phone, or the tablet. They are right, Apple just made it good enough to attract the masses.

The Microsoft surface, the google chrome book, and the Samsung smart watch are shining examples of the competition trying to lead, but only leading with something a bit disappointing.

Again, I expect appke to come up with a smart watch and a smart tv, and we will all say, "Oh, so that's hob it should be done."

Sierraa
Sierraa

Apple has changed, like the freelance market is changing now that they have that 5spot.ca site. On the other hand i think steve jobs would approve inwhat apple is doing if he was still with us. Apple has always had that smart way of making the smalest differences to draw its customers in wanting even more of its product!  quit amazing

OzarkGranny
OzarkGranny

There is a long list of companies that once were once at the top, but now are not, but it seems to be a sport for some to speculate that the mighty will fall.

VitalyGurevich
VitalyGurevich

Apple never invented anything; they just put a nice shell and user interface over already available products. It's all about marketing and having isheep available to gobble it up.

skodiblue
skodiblue

@kevinobrienx25  I've created an account solely for "liking" your comment/POV.

SteffenJobbs
SteffenJobbs

@mrbomb13 Replaced by which company?  Is there some company that you have in mind that's some expert of innovation.  Everyone says that Steve Jobs was unique.  Is there some other CEO you think is up to Steve's talent?  If that's the case then maybe Apple could hire this person that's going to revolutionize the tech industry like Steve did.  I understand that anything can happen but there are now just a lot of copycat companies out there and they're not all that willing to stick out their necks to make some huge changes.  You say if Apple isn't careful it could be in trouble.  Innovation doesn't grow on trees and there's probably no formula for it.  Sometimes companies just get lucky.  I'm only saying the future is unpredictable and who knows which way it will turn.  Apple certainly has the money to move mountains so it might not be all that easy to hold Apple down indefinitely.

slhilly
slhilly

@DeweySayenoff That's an awfully long comment from someone who doesn't know some basic facts. Sigh.

OS refers to the introduction of the original MacOS. Hollywood animation refers to Pixar. These are not exactly uknown parts of the Steve Jobs story. Had you said "I don't think that the introduction of MacOS had that disruptive an impact on the OS world", that would have been a, *ahem*, bold claim but at least it would have shown a passing recognition of the facts. Had you said "Pixar didn't change that much post-Jobs", again that would have been a courageous claim, but at least you wouldn't have looked like a complete muppet who clearly thought the reference to animation had to do with rendering software.

IanEberle
IanEberle

@DeweySayenoffI'm a huge Steve Jobs fan, but I must congratulate you and point out that this isn't "Apple hating." Everything you just said is true, and I agree with most of it. I always loved watching Steve's keynote speeches because, like you said, he could sell anything to anyone. Half the reason I always upgraded my Apple products is because Steve showed me why I needed it during the keynote speech. Nowadays, Tim Cook just goes over how many units they've sold and how much money they've made, then he invites someone else to the stage... But the person he invites is equally boring. It's not their fault, though, because engineers are engineers because they aren't good public speakers. Jobs was a good salesman, but he wasn't an engineer at all. Engineers (including Wozniak in the beginning) are great engineers, but they can't do Steve's job.


Since Steve's death, I've since sold both of my Macs and traded my iPhone for an Android phone. Apple used to innovate at least once a year, but since Job's death, they haven't really innovated at all. Innovating is taking something that's already invented (such as the MP3 player) and making it into something that EVERYBODY wants to buy because Apple has done it right. That's how they changed the MP3 market with the iPod, they changed the smartphone market with the iPhone, they changed the tablet market with the iPad, and so on. The problem with Apple's innovation, however, is only the first generation of a product is amazing. The first iPhone was so innovative compared to the Palm and BlackBerry devices that were currently available, but they have barely changed the phone since then. It's a bit slimmer, more powerful, has a bigger screen, and now has new software, but they just make minor upgrades. We can see that happen with everything - first iPod was amazing, following models just minor upgrades, first iPad, first MacBook Air, first iMac, etc.


Apple is about a year overdue to produce something that truly changes a NEW market instead of making minor upgrades to the products they already have (which is what they've done for the past 2 years). Rumors point to a television and a watch. I can see the TV making an impact if they price it competitively. But most people don't buy a new TV every few years, so I can't see a product launch taking off as well as the iPhone or iPad because it will be much more expensive. Not everyone will be able to just buy one because they want it.


Whatever they do, I'm scared for Apple. I like them as a company, but I no longer own anything made by Apple. Android phone and Windows 8 computers... Unfortunately, I've had to find innovation elsewhere because Apple hasn't been doing it.

lacrossestar83
lacrossestar83

I stopped reading after you apparently claimed the iTunes Store had no effect on the music industry.

ZonkerHarris
ZonkerHarris

@lehtovitra Examples?  Unlocking the device?  No change.  Turning on Wi-Fi!  Surely that's increased... nope, nevermind.  Maybe closing apps.  No wait, that's vastly improved.

ZonkerHarris
ZonkerHarris

@aztecian You're free to your opinion, but its worth noting that the vast majority appears to disagree with you.

alansky
alansky

@brenro12 You have absolutely no idea what you're talking about. You should go out and buy a teeshirt with a parrot on it. That would be perfect for you.

CharlesBoyer
CharlesBoyer

@brenro12 There are many examples since, but let us go back to 1984:


These all came from the original Mac group at Apple:
  • Drag-and-drop file manipulation
  • types and creators for files
  • direct manipulation editing of document, disk, and application names
  • multiple views of the file system
  • desk accessories
  • control panels

These came from the lisa group at Apple:
  • pull down menus
  • the clipboard

Ment
Ment

@grayzip  "Everything that can be invented has been invented." Charles H. Duell the Commissioner of US patent office in 1899

mahadragon
mahadragon

@Sierraa "i think steve jobs would approve inwhat apple is doing if he was still with us" - I don't agree with your comment. Have you seen iOS7? Lots of people including myself have gotten motion sickness from all the movement of the icons as you navigate between apps and the home screen. The cartoonish look of the icons would have gotten pushback from Jobs. It makes me afraid Jony Ive doesn't have anyone who can stand up to him and tell him what looks good and what doesn't. Before Jobs died, Jobs was the guy who could stand up to Ive and tell him that his idea sucked.

lacrossestar83
lacrossestar83

keep buying your android phone and parroting these lines while claiming that other people are sheep, and you are not one.

*pats you on the head*

ArjunMahesh
ArjunMahesh

@VitalyGurevich 

except they have been innovating and you fandroids just happen to ignore everything.

without apple you wouldn't know life as it is.

and your mouse would be the size of a brick.

SalvadorMorales
SalvadorMorales

@VitalyGurevich That is spot on. Innovator and CEO of the century?? He was succesful in marketing products, but inventing?? Innovating? Come on. He was succesful at bringing back to life his company, nothing else.

lacrossestar83
lacrossestar83

You know, it's not that they really like Android, it's that they simply hate Apple. It's like Republicans screaming about "Obamacare" while admitting that health care should be reformed, but without offering any solution of their own

G.M.Notcar
G.M.Notcar

@rdsf @VitalyGurevich Define working well.  I would argue that all the security issues (on average one per month it seems) indicate breakage.  I would argue that maps getting people lost means breakage.  I would argue that apps crashing way more often than on Android OR Winmo means breakage....

Azerd
Azerd

Yep. Because I'm a "isheep" go away. I don't understand why people like you can go to a forum just to argue a worthless fight. You won't change my view on Apple by saying all that stuff. I like apple products for how they look, I like them because I never rly need to buy a firewall for them. Is that bad? There will always be apple users, and there will always be people who waste there time hating it. So just go away. Go find some post asking when a game is going to be ported or something. Because that is where you belong

ZonkerHarris
ZonkerHarris

@SirCheese @CharlesBoyer @brenro12 "Chicken exists!" is not an argument against "I invented Garlic-Cilantro Chicken."  Just like USB isn't an invention, its just a serial cable and some ICs.  Just like any digital tablet isn't an invention, its just a tablet.  Talk to Moses about it.

AltonWang
AltonWang

@G.M.Notcar   when you make an argument, you better have real statistics to support it

new_options
new_options

@G.M.Notcar @rdsf @VitalyGurevich Yes, you are so right. iOS is so buggy. Nothing but crashing and hell all the time. Nothing like android which is so solid and just works all the time. Yes, that's it.