Fast Food Strikes: Unable to Unionize, Workers Borrow Tactics From ‘Occupy’

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Employees and supporters demonstrate outside of a Wendy's fast-food restaurant demanding higher pay on Monday in New York City.

Hundreds of fast food workers in seven cities across the U.S. walked out on their jobs Monday demanding a “living wage,” or double what many are making now. More strikes are expected this week in what’s become one of the biggest pushes to organize the industry’s historically disjointed workforce. And this time they’re using a different playbook.

For decades, fast food employees have essentially been unorganizable in any traditional sense, thanks in part to two factors: extremely high turnover and the industry’s ownership structure.

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The National Restaurant Association estimates that “quick-service restaurants” (a.k.a. fast food) have 75% employee turnover rates, meaning that three-quarters of its workers are completely new, year in and year out. Many fast food restaurants are also owned by franchisees, which can complicate things for workers seeking employer concessions. While often responsible for determining employee wages, franchise owners are still held on a tight leash by the companies themselves in terms of what they can pay. Those factors have largely prevented even the most basic efforts to unionize within the industry, which in turn has kept wages low.

“Industries with the worst conditions and wages, and therefore with the greatest need for unions, rarely have been sites of unionization,” says Peter Rachleff, a labor historian at Macalester College. “Workers just quit and seek other jobs, perhaps with a little better pay, perhaps with slightly less onerous conditions.”

The workers walking out this week are demanding their wages be doubled from the federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour to $15. But they’re going up against a corporate structure that has been able to keep any sorts of unionization efforts from creeping into the workplace for decades.

“It’s very easy for management to intimidate workers under the current structure, to run an aggressive campaign” to discourage unionization, says Richard Hurd, a labor relations professor at Cornell University. “Why put up with management pressure and try to hold out and get union recognition if you know realistically that you’re not going to be there that long?”

This week’s walk-outs seem less about truly unionizing (even though the workers’ efforts have received support from the Service Employees International Union) and more about building public momentum for a higher minimum wage. Instead of taking the traditional route of trying to reach some sort of collective bargaining agreement, they’re betting that an Occupy-style public awareness campaign, based on the idea that their wages are inherently unfair, perpetuate inequality and fail to move them up the economic ladder, will lead to change at either the state or federal level.

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Nelson Lichtenstein, a director at the Center for the Study of Work, Labor and Democracy at the University of California, Santa Barbara, says this week’s strikes are similar to those before the 1935 National Labor Relations Act, also called the Wagner Act, which established the right of private employees to organize. Before the law, employees targeted entire industries, like restaurants, saloons or building trades, instead of specific employers to achieve better working conditions.

“In that sense, there’s a return to that,” he says, citing recent protests against wages for Walmart employees. “There, the focus is on Walmart. But I think these walk-outs, because they’re targeting the entire fast food industry, are turning out to have more progress.”

So far, the fast-food strikes have taken place in New York, Chicago, St. Louis, Milwaukee, Kansas City, Detroit and Flint, Mich. While most of them involve the big fast-food chains like McDonald’s, Burger King and Wendy’s, retail employees have also joined in from Victoria’s Secret, Dollar Tree and Macy’s.

Several studies show that raising the minimum wage would have minimal effects on the industry as a whole. One letter signed by more than 100 economists and published by the University of Massachusetts said that raising the minimum wage to $10.50 would increase the price of a Big Mac by a nickel. Another study shows that doubling the salaries and benefits of all of McDonald’s employees would add 68 cents to each Big Mac.

But a living wage would have more long-lasting effects on the industry than just the price of its menu items. Lichtenstein says it would likely create permanent employment in the industry, meaning more of its workers would stay for two to three years, likely leading to further demands on working conditions.

“From the company’s point of view, if they know their employees are going to be there for three years, then there’s also this informal pressure on the managers to accommodate the workers,” he says, citing the possibility of  wage creep and further increased labor costs for employers. “Managers then can’t just move people around all the time. Firing gets more difficult. So they don’t want a permanent workforce.”

In the short-term, however, Lichtenstein says that the tactics the fast food workers are taking to generate public awareness likely won’t lead to a new era of organizing in the industry but could be successful in pushing elected leaders to re-examine the minimum wage.

“Will it create a stable, permanent organization?” he asks. “Probably not. Will it create enough oomph to raise the minimum wage? Maybe.”

130 comments
JamesKent
JamesKent

you should always expect yourself to be expendible because technology is advancing every damn day. automated devices n such are ridding of certain jobs but inturn creating a more high skilled job. somebody now needs to be able to service and support the automated machine. i understand if someones worked somwehere for 20 years but you'd be an ignorant fool to not keep up with the times and technology or else your gone! some palces dont even need a register worker in the front. you can order on a touch screen. 15 bucks is outrageous and ig you planned on working at a burger joint for a career...you need to evualuate your self...

ZacPetit
ZacPetit

Have to agree with some of the more conservative comments. Flipping burgers is not a difficult skill set. People should be paid based on how valuable their skills and knowledge are and how irreplaceable they are. Further, driving up the minimum wage will just drive up the cost of basic goods and services (more demand). Not only will this not really help unskilled laborers, but it will definitely hurt the middle class.

Ambrosia79
Ambrosia79

My question is... How can we raise a "fast food" wage to double ($15hr) when the people who take care of and teach our children are making $7.25 - $10hr??? I am all for raises especially if you have been with a company for 4... 8... 10yrs! But right out the gate I am not for!! It all depends (like every job) on EXPERIENCE! I do know that this will shed light on several careers, requirements and wages across the country.

mattjiggy
mattjiggy

Raising labor costs by 50% would increase prices by 1.5%?

Hilarious.

SukeMadiq
SukeMadiq

If the double the pay they will no longer need these ghetto high school dropouts to work for them!

AlmaFinanz
AlmaFinanz

I always wondered why all these fast food workers will not just go find a decent paying job.

Probably because they just can't find a higher paying job - lacking education and skills would surely qualify these persons for McJobs.

For sure McDonalds can absorb a wage increase, as it's still profitable:

http://simplefinanz.com/mcdonalds-financials-q1-2013/

Problem is if wages are raised, fast food chains costs will increase, prices will increase, sales will go down, and McWorkers will be fired.

Wouldn't be simpler if those protesting people would just fire themselves to save the efforts? 

In the end, if their protests succeed, that would be the result.


hautala18
hautala18

I don't think the problem is that people working at these places lack initiative, perseverance, hard work, ect. There are a lot of places struggling now. My dad lost his job at a tool and die shop after being there for 20 years, and it's been rough for him to find new work. What used to be considered a safe way to make a living isn't anymore, and most of the growth in our economy comes from companies who rely on cheap products and low wages to stay competitive. The problem is that now you have people dropping out of what was once a solid manufacturing industry, looking for work but finding it only in cheap dead-end jobs like McDonalds. Of course these people are going to try to make more money to support their families. I get tired of hearing how anybody who's struggling in this economy is that way because they are just a leach and there's nothing else to be said about it. It's not that way, sometimes the economy really screws over individuals and its just very hard to adjust.

Onepatriot
Onepatriot

There are lots of things wrong with the economics of day to day living such as: banks that won't lend, and oil companies ripping us off for gas prices that go up on holiday weeks because" the refineries are down for maintenance, I could go on and on. 

The thing is though, companies that don't pay their employees enough to get by on are  passing costs onto the rest of the taxpayers who pay for those food stamps and housing assistance.  We all know this and it's not right.  Their profits shouldn't be at the taxpayers expense.  All those workers aren't schoolkids working till they get out of college, and by the way, there are a lot of folks with college education who can't get a job these days and have to take these low paying jobs.  They're not all able to work harder and get themselves out of that job.  The path to do that just isn't there for a lot of them.

castaway98
castaway98

The fact of the matter is there are employees in this field making minimum wage or a wage low enough where they are also qualifying for and receiving food stamp or welfare assistance to make ends meet.

The question for the citizens is:  would you rather see the companies in question raise the wages of these employees so they no longer need/no longer qualify for the food stamp/welfare assistance (doesn't have to be $15.00 in this hypothetical), or would you rather continue to contribute additional tax dollars towards funding the welfare of these employed individuals?

lostsoul
lostsoul

maybe people should take responsibilty for themselves? what a concept.

I want to be paid to do nothing, and I am going on strike, until I get it!!!!!!!!

So many people feel  that they deserve so much for so little. WTF

whatsgoingon
whatsgoingon

I understand that people want a decent wage.  I am part of the over 40 crowd and have been a single mother for 20 years.  Fast food, retail department, and grocery stores and others like these business were always part time employment except for the manager positions (which you needed a degree for).  These types of jobs were only meant to get young adults enough cash to go to school or give them experience until they got a better job; or the mother who didn't want to put her kids in daycare and wanted some extra money while the kids where in school or at night when the husband got home from work.  Jobs are scarce and it's an employers market.  I have 3 young adult children and they work in the fast food industry.  All they hear from the older workers is complaining about how low there wages are, but not one of them is willing to go back to school to better themselves.  They complain they can't afford it, (get a student loan),  they don't want to go into debt (the higher paying job will pay for the loan).  These businesses are a stepping stone into the work force and should not be your career path. 

onlyinamerica
onlyinamerica

Pay people a "living wage" so that they too can have a decent life. I have a very hard time understanding how someone can live on 8.00 dollars an hour...this is after all the "greatest country in the world" they just don't tell you for whom. Is it so far fetched to think that everyone deserves to earn a decent wage that allows them to live comfortably, allows them to save for their future and gives them the assurance that they are living in the greatest country in the world.

seasons2216
seasons2216

The truth is that they should have let the stock market crash. Now "We the People" will struggle to keep a roof over our heads because our economy did not "RESET" itself. Think about it, if they had to start over everything would be cheaper, like after the Great Depression." - It also would have cost our government a LOT less for more unemployment than it did to spent "TRILLIONS" in bailouts, without regard for those companies to pay back and then the ones that did it, did so in bonds. What kind of a "scam" is that? We spent waaaaaaay more on those companies than on "welfare" for the low income families. - If they would have given every family in America that money it would have benefited "We the People" more than it has now. It doesn't matter how anyone spent it, even if they BLEW the money, it still would go back into the economy, and if things are selling, companies need employees to sell. - Hire a cleaning lady, more work. Eat out, more cooks, more waiters, more dishwashers etc... Buy a house, more money for Realtors, a home sold etc... Buy a car... well, you get it. Instead we gave the rich who could not do their jobs more money to make record profits, get their bonuses, keep their cell phones AND not hire, lay off, cut salaries and benefits... well you get the picture. - My solution; reenact the law that said you can't give a loan to someone for a home for more than 30% of their income and start selling homes again, get the money back from these companies IN CASH, with interest, close the "loopholes" for large businesses who "waste" money, take away the tax breaks they got in the past TO HIRE, until they hire and give back benefits, stop buying donuts and coffee at the government level that cost more than it costs the average family to eat for a week, stop traveling at the government level unless it is "crucial", and stop allowing congress to vote for their own raises, benefits etc... and stop the conflict of interest when it comes to big business lining politicians pockets. - If all this quits we don't have to worry about what McDonalds pays! And one more thing, get the gas prices in line with the economy!

netlans
netlans

A small raise might be nice but they want the same wage as someone fresh out of trade school.  Does not add up.  Put the same effort into school if you want to double your wages.  Underachieving and then asking for compensation because you did so is not the American way.   

j.warr
j.warr

I'm making minimum wage but I want a cell phone (with data plan), laptop/tablet, new car, internet, satellite for the car, satellite for the home, a couple of kids but I'm single, top of the line health care (low deductible), etc... can I get that for free because I'm worth it all.  If I don't have everything that everyone else has then I would feel bad about myself and will likely do nothing.  I need to be able to feed my two kids because I don't make enough. Yeah, I know, the kids just happened because well I needed free birth control (I just couldn't help myself).  I know I've made a lot of bad decisions and haven't taken my future very seriously but hey you can just step in and give me all of that, right?  I'm free to make all the bad decisions and work at the worst job ever and get paid the worst ever because I know you got my back.  Heck, why even go to work at McDonalds.  I'll just stay home and tweet all day you guys still got my back, right?  I mean c'mon... it's about my worth, not my education or skills.

soulbrother1
soulbrother1

I remember a time when jobs like these were good enough jobs for high schoolers or college students wanting to make there own funds without asking there parents for money all the time. Now a job a micky d's has become some families only means of income. It's a sad sad sad ordeal!!!


SukeMadiq
SukeMadiq

@Ambrosia79 

Teachers have some of the lowest SAT scores of any profession that require a college degree.  But the average teacher in my town makes 55k and retires with a 80% pension after only 20 years.

SukeMadiq
SukeMadiq

@mattjiggy 

Fast food labor cost is only about 15% of  all costs.  A big Mac that sell for 3 bucks would have a total cost of about a dollar to 1.50 and a labor cost of 15-22 cents, raise wages by 50% that would add a dime to the price.

Your education is hilarious!

ZacPetit
ZacPetit

@mattjiggy Hilarious? Such an increase would be disastrous to the middle class. I find nothing funny about it.

SteveCunningham
SteveCunningham

@hautala18 You don't get it. We are not calling them leaches because they want hire wages we are calling those who want something for nothing leaches that cause the cost of doing business to go up and thus creating a profit margin that is so small you have to sell billions in volume to create any profit at all. There is a reason the wages are low that because doing business with all the regulations,safety,environmental etc. cost sooooooo much that in order to compete you have to squeeze on labor due to the limited profit margins. Once labor costs get too high the focus is already on robotics that will our perform and out produce the laboror. So what was once a low wage will be come unemployed do the the higher cost of doing business which will not allow ANY profits to be made because the cost of a burger will simply be too high.

Liberal policies have killed jobs,businesses,manufacturing for over 60 years and so demanding hire wage does not mean that you can demand that people pay more for a burger nor can you demand that they desire to pay it. In all likelyhood people will simply make things themself as this trend already exists and growing or they will purchase from an individual vender like a food truck / lunch truck etc.

So no they are not leaches but the politicians and entitlement crowd are and this is what drives low wages for jobs. Because profits are based on the costs of doing business and weighted on the scale of volume of those customers that will purchase their products. If the volume goes down expotentially due to the higher cost of doing business and subsequent higher cost in good. The overall profit would be impacted negatively and may not even cover their costs.
They know the business model and the percentages and also with surveys and google they know for a fact how it will impact the overall business profits and likely would result in layoffs overall. It's sort of elementary really.

FuzzyElephants
FuzzyElephants

I'm a veteran, I went to college, and I now work at a minimum wage job.  I'm replying to you because your comment of "I want to be paid to do nothing" is blatantly false.  I'm on my feet 8 hours a day, constantly moving cleaning up the messes that people like you make.  My cheap made in china visor that I'm required to wear as part of my uniform is soaked through with sweat every single day with-in an hour of clocking in.   I've been at this job for a month and in that time I've dropped 15 pounds without even trying.  I go home from work each night dehydrated because I don't have time to stop and take a drink of water unless I'm on one of my two mandatory breaks.  So if you really think those of us making minimum wage don't do anything then my advice is get out from behind your computer and walk an 8 hour day in my non-skid shoes.  


I'm not part of these strikes, and I'm not screaming for a pay raise (despite my low wage my bills are paid), what I am asking for is a little respect and human decency. 

RekkaRiley
RekkaRiley

@whatsgoingon Speaking from a Millenial POV:

I've also heard a rather astounding amount of pressure from managers in low-end retail and fast food that they expect younger people to treat their minimum wage positions as if it were a life-long "career," rather than a stepping stone to reduce debt while trying to make it through college.

I was shocked the first time a manager told me that if I couldn't work constant overtime because of my college classes, than I would be out of a job because I "refused" to "dedicate myself to my career."  Why should I dedicate myself to a minimum wage position that costs me more in transportation than I actually make, if it means sacrificing my future ability to get a better job?  My "career" is ACCOUNTING, not retail or fast food.

More and more minimum wage managers expect people to treat those jobs as permanent careers...but they're not very good at giving any sort of reason why, or any kind of incentive.  

Even those jobs are getting harder to get, now that we're competing against our own parents for both work AND school...jobs that used to be great for earning experience are now gone because there's too many folks in the workforce who already have the experience and also need work.

Then we get yelled at for living at home and not getting work, because we don't have the required experience for any of the jobs (even some low-end retail jobs are demanding a 2-year college degree and 5+ years experience to be considered at all), so we can get a job that earns enough to afford to move out...

I'm fairly confident that my generation is going to start seeing the end of the nuclear family, in favor of multi-generational households where all the adult members contribute and share resources.  I'm already seeing cases among my own peers of multiple small unrelated families sharing a house together, because as individual nuclear families (just the parents and kids) none of them have the resources anymore to make it by themselves.  

Not that multi-generation households are bad; I always felt the strict nuclear families were sort of isolated and lonely...

...I did not intend to rant like that...I am so sorry!

greatestcountryUSA
greatestcountryUSA

@onlyinamerica Everyone is not entitled to a high paying job, the job pays what the market supports. These types of jobs are not meant to be permanent by any means, but people that have no ambition to better themselves cannot simply "demand" a doubling of their wage to improve their way of living. I started working at McDonald's at the age of 14 (yes, 14) and am now completing my MBA with a great job for a Fortune 500 company. The experience I gained during my time at McDonald's was indispensable and am happy I worked there. People need to stop thinking that they are just entitled without offering any new value to a company.

seasons2216
seasons2216

@netlans Really? So your McDonalds burger should come just as it is with no complaints then either, right? My guess is with all of the training that they go through they are better with people than you are... in addition, if you never worked fast food as a teen or any other time you have no idea how hard it is. I have a "trade skill" from community college, and my McDonalds job was "MUCH" harder than what I do today, not to mention the "crappy hours, smell and heat." - I think we Americans have a funny way of looking at what someone's salary should be. Most "slave wage" jobs are much harder than any job with a "trade" or a degree and when I was branch manager (not in food), I would have taken a "dedicated, already skilled person with LIFE experience" over someone just out of college with no clue about life and usually no dedication any day... I learned that from "experience."

seasons2216
seasons2216

@j.warr Yeah, we can all just stop having babies, that's the way it should be since we gave 7.7 trillion dollars in bailouts, actually more, that was what was doled out the last year of our previous president to the rich who obviously weren't smart enough to do their jobs right, who then got their bonuses that same year, the companies recorded "record profits, " and they were able to not only keep regular homes, but their cell phones, vacation homes, jets, yachts and much more, without hiring, continuing to lay off, not giving raises, cutting back benefits and much more, and STILL were getting tax cuts from several other years of congress passing them so they WOULD hire and they STILL are getting them. - So instead we keep the "middle class" from being able to get a job, WITH education that can keep a roof over their heads. - Say what you will, but 47% of America that are on food stamps ARE NOT JUST LAZY OR UNEDUCATED. - Next time you have an opinion start looking up FACTS first. Look up 7.7 trillion in bailouts, look up the "stipulations" to get food stamps (YOU HAVE TO HAVE A JOB or KIDS AT HOME AND "PROVE" YOU ARE ACTIVELY SEEKING EMPLOYMENT!) and after that look up the rest, MOST OF IT HAS BEEN REPORTED BY "LEGITIMATE" news that we all know and see EVERY DAY.

Pekoe
Pekoe

@j.warr Not everyone working a low wage job lacks an education. Some of us with an education were laid off so that employers could hire people without an education for half our educated pay. Or, they simply shipped the educated job to India. Some of us with an education can't find a job with our degree because we are "overqualified" and employers simply don't want (or need) to pay us what we are worth. Especially when they can get some high school drop-out to do the same job for half the price after a six month training. 

American education is so far behind the EU we've got 4 year degrees who can't even string a full complete sentence together. Never mind people who can communicate face-to-face.


vstillwell
vstillwell

@j.warrSo capitalism moved from a fair days pay for a fair days work to this stuff? They give a fair days work and they'll get 30 bucks if they're lucky, and that 30 bucks will be loaded onto a high fee debit card as well.  

Trying to justify these low wages is the same as someone trying justify prostitution as a noble profession that gives prostitutes a chance to pull themselves up by their own garter straps. 

SukeMadiq
SukeMadiq

@j.warr 

You are wrong, they would need at least triple wages to afford that in the city.   They just want enough to live on.

They should not expect to get by on 40 hours a week in those jobs, but I think anybody that works 55 hours a week should get paid enough to live on modestly and pay rent.

tom.litton
tom.litton

@soulbrother1 What i really want s for politicians to concentrate on creating high wage jobs for everyone.  But they would rather fight over deficits and budgets, because that is how they win elections.

SukeMadiq
SukeMadiq

@FuzzyElephants 

Either you are obese or working way too hard, look around some of these kids working with you are barley awake and moving!

onlyinamerica
onlyinamerica

Congratulations on your success and hard work I am sure you will be well compensated for the skills and knowledge that you now bring to your organization, but, high paying job? 15.00/hour? really? perhaps these jobs are not meant to be permanent but they are becoming the principal income for many individuals who may not have been as furtunate or driven as yourself , the fact of the matter is that they are working for a living and not expecting for their entitlement checks to come in...the more you make the more you spend the better it is for our consumer generated economy. 

NaveedXVO
NaveedXVO

@SukeMadiq @j.warr That's not the way the world works. You get paid what your skills are worth. Fast food workers skills are not in demand.

ZacPetit
ZacPetit

@SukeMadiq @ZacPetit @mattjiggy The rise of prices would not just be for fast food. Increasing the minimum wage in such a dramatic manner would immediately increase demand substantially for basic goods and services, thus dramatically increasing their prices. Anyone that didn't benefit from the increase in wage would be hurt by the increase in prices.

JackieMorrison
JackieMorrison

@onlyinamerica as you say, not as driven, maybe if these people would have stayed in school or at least stayed awake in class they would be able to get a better job, if they do not like their job then quit and find another place to flip burgers

tigelinus
tigelinus

@ValKain @SukeMadiq You are clearly far out of touch from reality.   If you think your cushy office management job, which you are more fairly compensated for, is equivalent to working for a rigid employer at minimum wage, then you're a fool.  

ValKain
ValKain

 @SukeMadiq

In my state, $15 an hour w/ Overtime Potential is more than where I am at with business professionals in an office environment.

What's to stop higher educated employees who want more pay for less work to leave their current job to flock to the fast food industry?  


Who would you hire, the college graduate, with a degree,  and more common sense to avoid Social Media PR Disasters or hire High School twits who haven't outgrown their need for social media glory?

What is there then to stop a larger company from paying their office workers more to retain them you might ask?  Well it eats into the profit so in turn they have to increase the cost of their goods and services.  It will be a ripple effect to all jobs and employees.


As entry level management at my job, why stress over managing a dozen employees when I could flip burgers for a small pay cut, less stress with the exception of the lunch and dinner rushes?  Scrubbing a desecrated public stall stinks, but arguable easier than trying to manage people.

markb3699
markb3699

@NaveedXVO @SukeMadiq @j.warr The reason why we have minimum wage laws in this country is to ensure people make the minimum amount a human being is worth. At one time that was enough to live on. It's not anymore. Adjusted for inflation, the minimum wage should be around $15 an hour. However, corporations and Republicans have blocked most attempts to raise it. Why do you think that is?

SukeMadiq
SukeMadiq

@NaveedXVO @SukeMadiq @j.warr 

Oh and you never get paid what you skills are worth.  You always get less and your employer keeps the rest as profit.   If an employer could get people to work for 3 bucks an hour that what he would pay them regardless if the bought in 30 bucks of profit per hour.   That is why we have the minimum wage.

SukeMadiq
SukeMadiq

@NaveedXVO @SukeMadiq @j.warr 

I was a compensation analyst for a fortune 100 company, but thanks.

However, if people can't live in the area they work in they will try to find other jobs.  Turnover will increase resulting in lower productivity and higher costs.

markb3699
markb3699

@SukeMadiq @markb3699 @tom.litton @soulbrother1 I was responding to your original post about the impossibility of creating high wage jobs. To say something is "impossible" without saying that "everyone's" taxes would be raised is not true. It is possible and it's been demonstrated that it's possible.

vstillwell
vstillwell

@SukeMadiq @tom.litton @soulbrother1 Yeah they can. Look around you, every large company out their with a lot of resources is sucking on taxpayers funds like leeches. Amazon won't build a fulfillment center unless taxpayers pay for half the facility. The moral of the story is that wealth is concentrated at the top. Around 70 percent of common stock in this country is owned by 10 percent of the population. Our government, or what's left of it, is being run by lobbyists. 

markb3699
markb3699

@SukeMadiq @tom.litton @soulbrother1 That's bull. A typical Republican talking point. I'm sure you don't support Obama, who if you remember, has proposed a few jobs programs. Republicans have voted down those plans because they don't like him, even though they say they're all about jobs. The last one would have raised taxes, but not on everyone.

SukeMadiq
SukeMadiq

@tom.litton @SukeMadiq @soulbrother1 

Yes, I have said those things before.  Germany highly supports its own industries.   In the USA half the people call it socialism and other don't want to make the up front investments.

Germany also has a strong tradesman program as a viable alternative to college.   This country is facing a shortage of things like plumbers and skilled machinists in the future.

tom.litton
tom.litton

@SukeMadiq @tom.litton @soulbrother1  

How about top notch infrastructure?  

Manufacturing government cooperations like they do in Germany.

Increase job retraining programs.

Keep student loan rates down.

Yes some of these will take money, but it shouldn't be too difficult to find it in the budget.

SukeMadiq
SukeMadiq

@tom.litton @SukeMadiq @soulbrother1 

I should add I do agree congress is being useless, they could tweek things to create some jobs, but some people seem to overestimate how much they can do is what I am saying.

SukeMadiq
SukeMadiq

@tom.litton @SukeMadiq @soulbrother1 

Well sure, but still it is not easy just to create jobs.   What do you suggest?    Less regulations - then consumers and the environment may suffer.   Lower business taxes?  Well we can never compete with other countries that have 3% rates anyway.

tom.litton
tom.litton

@SukeMadiq @tom.litton @soulbrother1 Sure they can.  If they are creating high wage jobs, then they will get revenue from those jobs.  Why raise taxes?

And no, i don't mean directly creating jobs.  I mean set the conditions so American can effectively compete for the high wage jobs.