Welcome Edits on Your Writing

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A good writer welcomes good edits. A bad writer resents them, seeing them only as personal attacks. Share your material while it’s still rough — the feedback will help you improve it much faster than if you were toiling in isolation. Routinely ask your colleagues, including those you supervise, to read your drafts and suggest changes. Have them mark up the document and submit their revisions in writing, rather than in person where you might react defensively. Always thank them for their help. Encourage others on your team to seek out edits and offer them. Having room to improve should be the norm, not a sign of weakness.

Adapted from the HBR Guide to Better Business Writing.

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39 comments
janiceyeung
janiceyeung

RT%s %s %s Great %s: good writers welcome edits, bad ones see them as personal attacks %slU5

krnx
krnx

@ameta_bal I don't think I've ever published anything without seeking an edit or an opinion first. But "good" is the key word here.

IALSaatchi
IALSaatchi

oh the power if a good edit “%s: Want to be a better %s? Learn to welcome a good %s | %s1jI (v%sess)”

Michaelmrw
Michaelmrw

@TIME @TIMEBusiness Read Re-Read what one has written & still the plank in the composer's brain blocks the view of need for a better prose

siemision
siemision

Always said editing made me a stronger writer. RT @TIME: Want to be a better writer? Learn to welcome a good edit | ti.me\/100QOcJZwi

DURBEM
DURBEM

@TIME @TIMEBusiness "Guerreiro é Guerreiro não se abate com golpes da vida Guerreiro de Verdade junta forças pra continuar o combate!"

krnx
krnx

@ameta_bal in that case I retract my serious response to your indirect suggestion.