Turning Group Coupons into Customers

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Group coupons from the likes of Groupon and Living Social can be great for bringing customers in the door, but how do you keep them there?

Connie Certusi of Sage offers a number of tips for turning group coupons into repeat customers. For starters, she advises companies not to discount their flagship products; only offer discounts on add-ons or additional products or services. Offer buyers bundled coupons so they make multiple purchases, and offer future discounts at a set date so customers come back. And be sure to let them know what the value of the offer is so customers know exactly what they’re getting from you.

Record any customer information, including contact and social media information and what they purchased, so you can send them future offers based on their buying habits.

Offer discounts to people who share your products and services with their social networks. Building your own social following is a great way to nurture customers, and texting campaigns are another effective way to stay in touch.

Change your offerings regularly, and be sure to give new customers a coupon for a return visit so they come back at a later date. And perhaps the most important advice of all: Make sure all of your customers have a pleasant experience. That will increase the odds that they will come back.

Adapted from How to Retain Group Coupon Customers at Small Business Computing.

3 comments
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dugunmekani
dugunmekani

Groupon should really be focusing on the one thing that matters to its real customers

BobBlock
BobBlock

We have used Groupon in Europe. While some offers have value we have found that most of the restaurants that make offer are terrible. That is why they see a need to make aggressive offers. However, this can backfire as when their quality is poor we certainly do not return and we tend to inform our friends of the poor experience. They need to do more research into why their business is poor - it's not the economy, it is their product. They should fix that portion first then drive business in; not the opposite way.