Aaron Swartz, Tech Prodigy and Internet Activist, Is Dead at 26

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Aaron Swartz, the brilliant young software programmer and Internet activist who inspired awe and reverence from leading figures in the technology world, died in his Brooklyn apartment on Friday, his family said in a statement. New York City’s chief medical examiner ruled the death a suicide by hanging. Swartz was 26 years old.

A computer prodigy, Swartz co-authored an early version of the popular Internet tool RSS at age 14 and would later become an early leader of Reddit, the social website that has become a locus of Internet activism.

A passionate advocate for social justice, Swartz founded the group Demand Progress, which played a crucial role in persuading the U.S. Congress to back down from controversial antipiracy legislation last year.

“Aaron’s insatiable curiosity, creativity and brilliance; his reflexive empathy and capacity for selfless, boundless love; his refusal to accept injustice as inevitable — these gifts made the world, and our lives, far brighter,” his family said in a statement. “Aaron’s commitment to social justice was profound and defined his life. He used his prodigious skills as a programmer and technologist not to enrich himself but to make the Internet and the world a fairer, better place.”

Swartz believed deeply that information — particularly that which might benefit society — should be made available for free to the public. In 2011, Swartz was indicted on federal data-theft charges for breaking into the MIT computer system and allegedly downloading 4.8 million documents from the subscription-based academic research database JSTOR.

Swartz was facing up to 35 years in prison and a fine of up to $1 million. He pleaded not guilty. His trial was set to begin this April.

(MORE: Reddit Co-Founder Aaron Swartz Indicted for Data Theft, Could Face 35 Years in Prison)

In 2008, Swartz wrote a program to download some 20 million pages of legal documents from PACER, the Public Access to Court Electronic Records system, which charges 10 cents per page for access. Working with other activists, Swartz sought to make the documents available to the public at no charge. The government cracked down on this effort but did not file charges.

Swartz’s efforts to “liberate” information from JSTOR and PACER made him a hero — indeed a legend — among Internet activists. Swartz was an early leader at Reddit, the giant online activist hub that has become a potent force in Internet politics. Reddit was sold to publishing giant Condé Nast in 2006. He later founded the group Demand Progress, which would play a key role in the epic 2011–12 battle between Internet activists and the entertainment industry over controversial antipiracy legislation. (TIME Warner, parent company of TIME, supported the legislation, which was ultimately defeated.)

Swartz, who studied at Stanford University for one year before dropping out, would later become a fellow at Harvard University’s Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics, where he worked with Lawrence Lessig, the renowned law professor and activist. Over the years, Swartz worked with Lessig on several major projects, including Creative Commons and Rootstrikers.

“He was brilliant and funny,” Lessig wrote in a blog post Saturday. “A kid genius. A soul, a conscience, the source of a question I have asked myself a million times: What would Aaron think?”

(MORE: SOPA Protests Gain Steam as Web Activists Flex Growing Clout)

Swartz wrote candidly and movingly about his struggles with depression and other illnesses. In a 2007 blog post, he described lying in bed for weeks at a time. “Go outside and get some fresh air or cuddle with a loved one and you don’t feel any better, only more upset at being unable to feel the joy that everyone else seems to feel,” Swartz wrote. “Everything gets colored by the sadness.”

In a statement, Swartz’s family criticized the way the federal government has handled the JSTOR case. “Aaron’s death is not simply a personal tragedy,” his family wrote. “It is the product of a criminal-justice system rife with intimidation and prosecutorial overreach. Decisions made by officials in the Massachusetts U.S. Attorney’s office and at MIT contributed to his death.”

News of Swartz’s passing prompted an outpouring of grief from those who knew him well, as well as from the broader technology and Internet community. “Aaron had an unbeatable combination of political insight, technical skill and intelligence about people and issues,” Cory Doctorow, co-founder of the technology site BoingBoing, wrote in a heartfelt tribute to Swartz. “I think he could have revolutionized American (and worldwide) politics. His legacy may still yet do so.”

Tim Berners-Lee, who is considered the founder of the World Wide Web, wrote on Twitter: “Aaron dead. World wanderers, we have lost a wise elder. Hackers for right, we are one down. Parents all, we have lost a child. Let us weep.”

Swartz’s family and friends have set up a memorial page here.

78 comments
jasturm
jasturm

It is very difficult our days to fight the Americanowsky way of life. We can dispair and  do what he done, but let us remember the American way of life and fight for it. My condolences for all that knew him.

jp28@satx.rr.com
jp28@satx.rr.com

When a Man performs a homicide it is always wrong unless due process of law is maintained. A mature and true activist respectful of social justice and Law would undeerstand this important point. Mr Swartz was too distracted with his own narrow mission to allow himself to ponder

alternative possibilities of action. What a waste of life!

caroloaltman
caroloaltman

OmiGod folks please read Anatomy of an Epidemic. yes he was depressed but these anti-depressants turn people into killing/suicidal zombies. Just google suicides and antidepressants and you will be shocked. A small percentage become suicidal on the SSRIs, not everyone, but if it's your brother or sister or son or daughter etc it doesn't matter. We have to stop people from taking these drugs

ruairimckiernan
ruairimckiernan

R.I.P Aaron. What an incredible guy he was. His spirit lives on. So sad to know he suffered like this. Let us remember him and carry forward his work and look after each other along the way. 

Here's my 10 minute video interview with him from January 2010. Worth a watch: http://youtu.be/JUt5gjqNI1w

mrbomb13
mrbomb13

OH, and one more thing...

THANK YOU TIME MAGAZINE AND SAM GUSTIN for totally misleading readers with that absurd characterization of Aaron Swartz in the title.

He might have been a prodigy.  He might have been an activist.  But, at the end of all things, he was a damn criminal for stealing all of that information.  Nice of you to leave it out of the title!

Again, good riddance!!

mrbomb13
mrbomb13

Based upon what I've read in this article, I have zero sympathy for Aaron Swartz.  Only a year older than me, Swartz was a known COMPUTER HACKER AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY PIRATE.

Through some stroke of incredible luck, the depressed thief managed to become a member of a Harvard Ethics panel while being caught by the Federal Government for STEALING tens of thousands of documents.

For such thievery, Swartz deserves no pity or praise.  He deserves no accolades, no applause, and no awe-inspiring eulogies.

Did anyone begin to think that he was depressed, because (deep in the inside of his unhacked soul) he felt remorse and/or guilt over what he did?  Guess the article didn't consider that viewpoint; it would be too moralistic/ethical...

Good riddance to 21st century criminals!!

CynthiaRouse
CynthiaRouse

Anti depressants cause suicide in many patients. Anti psychotics cause suicide and homicide( see US mass murders, check their Rx)

Watch the commercials for these drugs, and listen to the "side effects" they list. This is what they admit to.

No one really knows what happened, yet. But the beauty of  modern technology is that, eventually, they will.

I hope he faked his death to escape prosecution. It is more likely that private intelligence had something to do with it, or industrial sabotage, or an individual about whom Mr. Schwartz knew too much.

These dudes are aware of life. If there was a "culprit" somewhere, in some corner of the world, the information is already out there.

Ironic, isn't it?

JoanKaiser
JoanKaiser

Aaron took his own life, not because he was facing prison time, but because he suffered from PREEXISTING severe depression; the severe depression existed before he was "caught", not as a result of getting caught.  He admitted that he suffered from the debilitating depression.  Our society needs to focus on removing the stigma of severe depression and mental illness so that brilliant people like Aaron can get the help they need before they take their own lives and/or the lives of others.  

Whatanotion
Whatanotion

Once you get to law school and pay to find out what was available for free at the public library you start becoming jaded against altruism.  You find out that the preamble to the US constitution is meaningless and that legal fictions are meaningful.  That's when you realize you're a dead man walking.  We here in the U.S are an idea.  That's it.  We are an idea that can take your child's life and ruin it with impunity.  And we are one of the best places to live!  Now there's a face slapping to recover from.   

Wake up and smell the coffee!  It's bitter and lukewarm.  And the cook has an assault weapon he believes will protect him from those who his ancestors cheated out of life and property.


galenz
galenz

@caroloaltman Only bipolars (type 1 or 2) can get suicidal with SSRIs. We are only now learning to properly identify bipolar. Goldberg Screening tool is good. It is NOT the medications it is how we analyse and utilise appropriately. Lithium can be a lifesaver, literally. Indeed it is perhaps impossible to estimate the potential number of briliant lives lithium has already 'saved'. Bipolar 2 patients need to be supported more than any other type of psych patients by family and friends and encouraged to DEAL with their problem, there is no point in slagging off the medical establishment. Compliance rates with bipolar are terrible and that is the sad truth. Listen and learn.

samikx
samikx

@mrbomb13 How can you have zero sympathy for someone who had spent over half of their lifetime with clinical depression? How can you have zero sympathy for the premature death of such a brilliant individual? For you to so readily say 'good riddance' to such a bright and young person full of so much potential seems absurd and downright alarming. 

As far as whether or not you find his actions "ethical" is concerned, I find it highly unethical for any entity to willingly withhold knowledge from society and hold it at ransom in the manner that our national educational institution does. I think access to knowledge is an inherent and God-given right, and clearly so did Mr. Swartz. 

I don't care what you think about the merit of his actions or about his integrity. His intention was to distribute knowledge to the public, which I believe is quite honorable. 

lindsncal
lindsncal

“First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.” In this case he was destroyed. He was obviously a genius and wanted to do things to keep us honest and create a better and informed world. When you finally realize who your real enemies are, you're going to be embarrassed.

zaiger
zaiger

@CynthiaRouse Antidepressants don't cause suicide. Depressed people are often times on antidepressants when they kill themselves, this is true, but that is because they were depressed to begin with. And many murderers are on anti-psychotics because they were psychotic to begin with. People need to start taking responsibility for themselves.

dark_moonstone
dark_moonstone

@galenz @caroloaltman I'm not sure where you're getting your information, galenz. Saying only bipolars get suicidal on SSRI/SNRIs is nonsense. I am a depressive. I have been on and off antidepressents most of my life. I function better off them than on. ANYONE can become suicidal/homicidal on these drugs. They cause atypical reactions to stress. What this means is that people who have never been violent in their lives, are prone to act out against themselves or others. They also cause obsessive thoughts to become unmanageable. Those lovely dark horrible mantras we tell ourselves when we're on a downslide become impossible to dispell, whereas when one isn't hindered by too many neurochemicals, it's possible to work through what's going on. I'm glad you believe Lithium is so all-natural that it isn't killing you. Try some noni fruit, instead of something that's poisoning you. Going off the drugs too quickly makes things worse, which is why the "they missed their meds" has become such a good excuse. If you go off slowly and safely, eventually your brain is able to heal and you can get back to dealing with life on life's terms. Just because someone is getting their drugs does not mean they're being monitored by a health professional. They are programs for drugs. There aren't programs for working with a real live person (unless you've become so non-functional, thanks to the drugs, that you qualify for disability benefits in the US). With Swartz, the system knew he was on these drugs and pushed him just as surely as if they pulled the trigger. They know very well that these drugs cause suicidal/homicidal ideation, and what's the best way to get rid of a problem without getting your hands dirty? Cause enough stress that they go away by themselves. If you think it doesn't happen, get out more. The DSM is not based on science. It's based on marketing. The system IS the reason for high suicide rates. Maybe MDs should go back to being MDs, instead of drug pushers.

sisne
sisne

As long as they comply in taking their lithium it doesn't matter if we lie to them resulting in long-term thyroid and kidney problems, etcetera.

caroloaltman
caroloaltman

@galenz @caroloaltman Galenz- I understand your reasoning and I won't disagree with you that some people definitely need meds but you are right about how we diagnosepeople. A lot of people are misdiagnosed as bi-polar (is the testing really accurate or good?) and then they go on meds and their brain chemistry is altered permanently and they can't get off the drugs and some become suicidal and some turn into the Adam Lanzas of the world. PLEase READ THIS BOOK. it made me so upset. and yes, it is the medications. Prozac was barely tested before it came on the market and it's been proven that Eli Lilly presented false documentation. They never proved the drugs worked, just the opposite. How they got the drug on the market is beyond comprehension. The only explanation is $$$$. if you are interested in this topic then read the book. The library has it. It's fascinating and horrifying at the same time

mrbomb13
mrbomb13

@JayJaay @mrbomb13 

Personal attacks won't get your position anywhere.

Care to substantiate your disagreement with an objective response?

mrbomb13
mrbomb13

@samikx @mrbomb13

First, thanks for your reply.  In light of the subject matter, your questions are certainly fair.  Here are my responses:

1) I certainly felt sorry for Swartz's clinical depression; I would not ever wish such a diagnosis on anyone.  For that, I have sympathy.

2) However, my sympathy ends when Swartz decides to steal thousands of pages of government files with the intention of playing Robin Hood (i.e. stealing from the big, mean feds to feed the poor, uninformed populace).  That makes him a criminal, and entitles him to a fair trial and conviction.  Swartz made the choice to engage in that lifestyle without coercion.  He therefore deserves the 'criminal' label.

3) Swartz's death was not "premature."  If it was premature, that would mean his life was unintentionally (and unfairly) cut short.  Likewise, his suicide was fully intentional, with him deciding to take his own life.  Since it was the end that he wanted, I fail to see why I should be sympathetic.  After all, he chose to do it on his own.

4) I fully recognize that Swartz was a bright, talented young man.  Believe me, with his aptitude and talents, he had a very successful future in store.  If he could write RSS, imagine what else he could have contributed 10 years from now.

However, again, he used his talents for the illicit gain of government information through computer hacking.  That makes him a criminal.  Government information is accessible to the general public for very clear reasons.  Hackers who bypass government firewalls are a national security risk, and must be stopped swiftly and effectively.  

The fact that Swartz was caught was justified; who knows how much other information he could have stolen.  That stolen information could have been given to adversarial nations, or even to more covert enemies of the USA.  I don't know about you, but I don't want to risk another 9/11 happening again.  With that in mind, can you really blame me for saying, "good riddance?"

5) "I find it highly unethical for any entity to willingly withhold knowledge from society and hold it at ransom in the manner that our national educational institution does."  Please clarify what you mean by, 'national educational institution.'  Furthermore, please clarify how that institution, 'holds the knowledge at ransom.'  

6) "I think access to knowledge is an inherent and God-given right, and clearly so did Mr. Swartz."  As a teacher, I can say that access to knowledge in general is a God-given right, and we as human beings never stop learning.  However, some information is not meant for our viewing (i.e. launch codes for nuclear missiles, tracking files for known criminals, etc.).  I know that, you know that, and Swartz certainly knew that too.  

7) "I don't care what you think about the merit of his actions or about his integrity."  Okay, that's your right not to care.  But, when Swartz stole all that information, he was committing unethical behavior.  His actions were unmerited, and the dishonest method he took spoke volumes about his lack of integrity.  All of that adds up to why the government almost prosecuted him.  

8) "His intention was to distribute knowledge to the public, which I believe is quite honorable."  By trying to make his intention sound noble, you ignore the fact that his actions were criminal.  In this day and age, 'Robin Hood'-type behavior can land a man in federal penitentiary.  

You and I both know that there are honest, noteworthy, and legitimate ways to distribute knowledge to the public.  As a teacher, I did so in a classroom setting.  Swartz, however, took an illegal path.  My point was to call him out for his crimes, and note how he is a case of using genius for illicit means.  The world already has enough IT hackers, pirates, and thieves.  

mrbomb13
mrbomb13

@JayJaay @mrbomb13 

As mentioned above, please don't resort to personal attacks; they make your position appear weak and hollow.

Please respond in an appropriate manner, with an objective response.

mrbomb13
mrbomb13

@lindsncal

Forgive me for not fully understanding your response, but two questions:

1) Since he was the one who killed himself, how was he destroyed by others (i.e. the "they" in your quote)?

2) "When you finally realize who your real enemies are, you're going to be embarrassed."  Please clarify what you mean by that statement.

Also, I acknowledge that Swartz was a genius (not just anybody can hack into a government database).  However, he obtained all that information through dishonest means.  Therefore, I fail to see how he's keeping us honest when he himself was a Pillar of Dishonesty.

sisne
sisne

http://www.psycheducation.org/depression/meds/LithiumRisks.htm

Of course, the benefits outweigh the negatives, right? Psychiatry's main responsibility is to society, and that is why keeping pertinent information from patients is acceptable. Compliance trumps facilitating responsibility in patients. It is too difficult and too costly to build up the manifold of strategies required for people who have particular emotional needs to succeed.

galenz
galenz

Dont be so silly. That is why their levels and bloods are monitored. Lithium is a mineral not a "drug", we all need a little bit

caroloaltman
caroloaltman

@galenz @caroloaltman you still don't get it. They committed suicide because of the drugs. had they not been on the drugs they would have been bi-polar, but alive. My friend's son was bi-polar most of his life but not suicidal. They put him on Prozac when it first came out and he blew his brains out in front of his girlfriend just one month later. try telling my friend it was not the meds. you can choose to believe whatever you want but thousands of people are dying because of these meds and one day it will all be exposed. Read the book...please. I have no reason to promote this book other than the fact that he did outstanding research and what he uncovered is sickening. The mentally ill are being used as guinea pigs to make the drugs companies rich. once they go on the drugs their brain chemistry is so altered they have no choice but to stay on them for life or until they commit suicide unfortunately. I probably know 10 people on these meds who swear it helps them but I see no difference in their behavior whatsoever. they become zombie-like and then I have to worry about them commiting suicide or going a killing spree when they were completely harmless and only mildly depressed to begin with due to some sad life event.

galenz
galenz

@caroloaltman @galenz The simple reason bipolar has been underdiagnosed for 25+ years is the highly flawed DSMIII, pure and simple. The updated DSM is thousands of bipolar suicides too late. Do NOT blame the indutry or the medical establishment and try and be a little more circumspect if you want to help reduce suicide rates. The loss of genius is what real hits us in the guts. I deal with this stuff every day and had gtwo close friends who committed suicide last year, both bipolar and both brilliant.

mrbomb13
mrbomb13

@JayJaay @mrbomb13 

To set the record straight:

JayJaay has no depth or substance to support his/her position.  He/she initially gave off the impression of wanting to engage in a rational discussion about my comment.  For awhile, it looked as if that discussion would be possible.

With this latest comment, JayJaay's intentions are now made quite clear.  He/she never had any intention of engaging in discussion.  The most elegant prose he/she was able to construct were obscenities, vulgarities, and other personal attacks.  

In other words, there was hardly anything but anger and outrage in his/her side of the discussion.  Thus, what you've witnessed is JayJaay's ranting responses to my comments.  By posting that "troll" comment, JayJaay tacitly concedes that he/she didn't want a response; he'she just wished I would "go away [back to my troll cave presumably]."

It's too bad the discussion had to end like that; I would have liked to advance it further.  That's, after all, how real learning from each other occurs.  I gladly invite him/her, and anyone else to discuss.  Thank you.

JayJaay
JayJaay

@mrbomb13 @JayJaay Oh, I understand now. You're a troll in drag. Shame on me for feeding the troll. 

Sorry everyone for subjecting you to this idiocy. I'll shut up now. 

mrbomb13
mrbomb13

@JayJaay @mrbomb13

http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/good-riddance.html

The link above provides the root of our disagreement.

Originating in Great Britain, "good riddance" came to be known as, "An expression of pleasure on being rid of some annoyance - usually an individual."

Now, expressing pleasure could be synonymous with celebrating something.  However, that's just like saying "a shape with 4 sides and 4 right angles" could be a square.  Or, it could be a rectangle.  The point is that, without further detail, you don't really know for sure.  Furthermore, without additional data, it's highly presumptuous to assume either way.

With the "Square v. Rectangle" example, you have a 50-50 shot of being right.  However, the interpretations of the English language are not so absolute.  A century ago, if you said  "I'm gay," that meant you were feeling "happy."  In today's society, that same comment would mean 1) you're a homosexual, 2) you're pretending to/pantomiming you're a homosexual, 3) that you're happy, or 4) a combination of #1-3 (among other meanings).

To bring that explanation full circle, when I said 'good riddance,' I was aiming for the "pleasure" connotation of the phrase.  Specifically, I was pleased that a gifted criminal removed himself from the equation - thereby sparing the rest of us from his criminality.  You would have no problem if I said it about a robber, thief, or burglar who stole precious items/information.  This is in the same vein of thought as that.

Additionally, when you say "celebrate," I think of "throwing a party."  That's why I disagree - because I don't mean to say, "let's throw a party!"  Unfortunately, that was your misinterpretation.  Additionally, it shows the limits of an online discussion.  When you're left with just words to read (and no face-to-face interaction), much gets lost in the dialogue.

JayJaay
JayJaay

@mrbomb13 @JayJaay Are you an idiot? 

If someone say 'good riddance' toward another person who killed themselves, how else are we suppose to take it? It's a celebratory statement. I don't need to explain this to you anymore. Explore your own soul, young one. 

mrbomb13
mrbomb13

@JayJaay @mrbomb13 

The only "we" is you.  

As long as you're playing Dirty Harry, with a comment like that, "you're a legend in your own mind."

samikx
samikx

@mrbomb13  @JayJaay

From what I can tell, you have a rigid "law is law" kind of mentality. Everything is linear, and all actions have their consequences which are decided in a court of law. In your mind, a criminal is a criminal, regardless of their intention. A crime of passion is still a crime. In this kind of mindset, morality can only exist within the confines of the law.

From a compassionate standpoint, the value of an education MUST supersede the dollar amount of the articles that comprise it. 
The culmination of some of the best and brightest minds in the world should not be restricted from the general public. I don't care who owns the copyright, by withholding knowledge you are hindering the fulfillment of our society's potential. 

I can say without fear of prosecution that I have, in the past, pirated medical text books. So, if after graduation I end up saving lives because I pirated documents that were several hundred dollars out of my budget, am I still a criminal? And if so, should I be prosecuted? 

mrbomb13
mrbomb13

@JayJaay @mrbomb13 @samikx 

First, I did read JSTOR's statement in full.

Second, just because Swartz returned the copied material did not mean that others (i.e. non-subscribers of JSTOR) didn't illegally download what Swartz made available.  For every illegal download that took place, that is lost revenue for JSTOR.  JSTOR's profit margin is thereby lowered (unless they can recover those revenues).

Until that happens, JSTOR merely got a hacker to return what he stole.  

I invite you to explain how my responses are in any way "arrogant."  If you can't (as before), then please refrain from further personal attacks.

mrbomb13
mrbomb13

@JayJaay @mrbomb13 @samikx 

As a point of information, the school day goes from 8:10am to 3:30pm.  Currently, it is 5:22pm (Eastern Standard Time).  Therefore, I am not supposed to be in school.

However, while I'm lesson planning, I enjoy engaging in this discussion (and others).

JayJaay
JayJaay

@mrbomb13 @JayJaay @samikx Wrong. They didn't pursue him for compensation. Please read the statement put out by JSTOR. They settled the case with Swartz when he returned the copied material. 

You are as arrogant as you are misinformed.  

mrbomb13
mrbomb13

@JayJaay @mrbomb13 @samikx 

Yes, I am a teacher, and I suspect that I would have a field day if you were one of my students.  

Before you deem my point to be 'moot,' I recommend you re-read what I wrote.  

I did not say that he stole launch codes/classified information.  Those were presented as examples of the damage that computer hackers/IT pirates can cause.  Also, he did not merely "copy scientific studies."  Instead, he bypassed the firewalls, downloaded millions of pages of articles, and then made them available for public consumption - free of charge.

Now, for people like me and you, that's fantastic to have access to all of those 'freebies.'  However, for the database companies (JSTOR and PACER), his actions robbed them of legitimate revenues (for each legally purchased copy).  What you're not understanding is that those companies are entitled to those revenues, and had the right to pursue Swartz for just compensation.  It's no different than free songs downloaded off the Internet, with absolutely zero proceeds going back to the singers/songwriters. 

Unfortunately, you're stuck on the point that, "everybody now has access."  While that's true (for now - until the government cracks down), you're missing the effects on the business-side of the equation.

Sorry, but this Robbin Hood-"Internet prodigy" is no better than your average thief.

JayJaay
JayJaay

@mrbomb13 @samikx Are you seriously a teacher? That is frightening.

He didn't steal launch codes or classified information. He copied scientific studies which are now freely available from the source he copied them from. So your whole point is moot.

You, sir, you are NUTS! 

JayJaay
JayJaay

@mrbomb13 @JayJaay Maybe when you get older, you'll look back at your comments and see what an i diot you were back in 2013. 

Later, je rk. 

mrbomb13
mrbomb13

@JayJaay @mrbomb13 

Since you have failed to provide any justification for the creep/a-hole/son of a B insults, I will not even acknowledge them as legitimate/valid responses.

Since you have failed to provide any justification for your claim that I'm celebrating Swartz's suicide, I deem the claim invalid and inappropriate.

Since you don't care about the thoughts of the opposing side, I can only assume that you have no stronger argument for your position.

Since you call me out, but then don't even bother to respond appropriately when questioned, I can only label your "challenge" as ill-conceived and weak.

Lastly, since each of your responses have been tainted by anger and personal prejudice, I would advise you to "look in the mirror" before you say that I "suck as a human being."

JayJaay
JayJaay

@mrbomb13 @JayJaay Again, you are a creep, a-hole, son of a B, etc. for celebrating this person's suicide. I don't care about your opinions. I am personally calling you out because you suck as a human being.