Lessons from Superstorm Sandy

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Superstorm Sandy is now in the history books, but there’s no end to the lessons that can be drawn from it.

An article on disaster recovery in the wake of the storm impressed me with the human aspect of the recent disaster in the Northeast and the everyday heroes who did their best to cope with it, both businesses and their customers.

(PHOTOSThe Toil After the Storm: Life in Sandy’s Wake)

Like Satellite WellBound in Hamilton, New Jersey; the dialysis company did its best to deliver its life-saving services despite four days without power, internet, phone or heat. Not many of us would wish for that kind of opportunity to impress our customers, but it’s clear that the company understood how important its mission is. There are literally hundreds of stories like that from the disaster.

What is most striking about the storm is how everyone came together. In dozens of interviews, there were no reports of employees being ordered into work before dealing with urgent family matters. Customers didn’t expect miracles; they just wanted to know what to expect and how to move forward. In short, it was a pretty good blueprint for how to run a business: Treat your employees well and be honest about what you can deliver while doing your very best.

And needless to say, if the storm convinced you that you needed a disaster recovery plan, don’t get complacent as the threat passes. The article, by Enterprise Storage Forum editor James Maguire and a team of writers, had a number of disaster recovery tips, an issue we’ve covered here before too.

Adapted from Disaster Recovery: IT Pros Handle Hurricane Sandy at Enterprise Storage Forum.

1 comments
margaux3TKA
margaux3TKA

We do not need another Sandy to remind us of the importance of having disaster coordination plan. This is entirely true to all sorts of business. A careful planning will greatly help them to identify their business priorities. It will also give them a clear visualization on how to manage and mitigate risks. Before another disaster strikes, they are prepared for the worst to come.