Is It Time to Declare the Nissan Leaf a Flop?

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The headline for a recent Detroit News story has it that the “20,000 sales target [is] unlikely” for the Nissan Leaf. But “unlikely” is probably understating things. It appears as if Nissan won’t get halfway to its 20,000-Leaf target for 2012, nor will it top last year’s mark of 9,679 units sold—which was itself a disappointment.

Thus far in 2012, Nissan has sold 4,228 all-electric Leafs, a decrease of 31.5% compared to the same period last year. Last month, 685 Leaf purchases were made in the U.S., a 50% decline compared to August 2011.

It’s understandable that electric-car sales aren’t exactly booming. This is a niche market, after all, and one that’s very new and unfamiliar to consumers. Even with government incentives, plug-ins are still very expensive compared to gas-powered cars, and all-electric vehicles like the Leaf can’t be used practically for road trips, or any journey of more than 75 miles or so.

(MORE: 10 Things That Cost Way More Outside the U.S. (Including the Nissan Leaf))

Still, one would expect that even if Leaf sales weren’t going gangbusters, they’d at least not be on the decline. That is, these are the expectations one would have if they believed the Leaf had a decent future ahead of it.

Even when gas prices spiked to nearly $4 per gallon in early 2012, electric car sales struggled. Just 478 Nissan Leafs sold in February, a month when gas prices were soaring around the country, especially so in California—a state where energy-conscious drivers are more inclined to be open to EVs such as the Leaf to begin with.

The other plug-in most often mentioned in the same breath as the Leaf—the Chevy Volt—hasn’t been a runaway hit either. But at least sales are growing. Through the first five months of 2012, Chevy sold 7,000 Volts, which was more than it sold in all of 2011. Sales have remained on the rise since then. In August of 2012, 2,831 Volt purchases were made, an 800% increase over the previous August. For the year thus far, Volt sales totaled nearly 13,500, up 325.5% over the same period in 2011. Granted, unless a miracle occurs, GM won’t hit its projected 2012 sales goal of 45,000 Volts, but at least sales are on the upswing.

(MORE: As More Hybrids Hit the Market, All-Electrics Still Trying to Catch On)

The same can’t be said of the Leaf, and the most obvious reason why is so-called “range anxiety.” That’s the worry drivers have when behind the wheel of a car that could run out of juice when a recharging station is nowhere nearby. Owners of the Volt, which runs on electric and gas power, experience no such anxiety—which is probably one of the reasons they chose a Volt over a Leaf in the first place.

The age of the Leaf, and mass-produced electric cars in general, is still quite young. It’s possible that the Leaf could one day catch on in a substantial way, or that another vehicle that runs purely on electric power could become as commonplace as the Toyota Corolla on roads in the future.

For the time being, though, the idea once passed around that the Leaf would be a “Prius Killer” now sounds laughable. Toyota’s new Plug-in Prius, which is only available in 15 states, is already outselling the Leaf. Toyota sold 1,047 plug-in electric Prius vehicles in August 2012, and a total of 6,082 for the year, compared to 685 and 4,228, respectively, for the Leaf. And the Prius family in general is a giant in the industry, with nearly 250,000 sales in the first quarter of 2012 alone.

(MORE: One Nation on Welfare: Living Your Life on the Dole)

What the numbers seem to be saying is that the Leaf is not only failing to replace the Prius as the fuel-efficient, eco-conscious car of choice, it is also increasingly looking like a flop.

Brad Tuttle is a reporter at TIME. Find him on Twitter at @bradrtuttle. You can also continue the discussion on TIME’s Facebook page and on Twitter at @TIME.

220 comments
tonyscott
tonyscott

i will say it again, the leaf is a great ev the problem is the price Nissan need to make a no frills model and sell it at cost price for 12 18 months to create a following ! then the profit will flow !  

getalife
getalife

All I can say is I love my leaf! NO GAS should I say it again? We have a 5.6 khw DC solar on our home. We charge the car run all our heat and electric and over generate every month. HUMM free well till we pay off the solar. The scientific fact is electric motor is more efficient then a 150 moving part gas explosion internal combustion motor. Based on a steam engine design from many many years ago. So lets move on maybe? Oh thats right most Americans want to live in the stone age. It is fine with me if people don't want a Leaf or any electric car. Keep going to the GS paying thousands for gas every year. Keep changing the oil, all that mess. Keep giving all your money to 700% profit oil companies polluting the plant. If that is what floats your boat. Me I take my Leaf NO GAS!

Promontorium
Promontorium

I called this one the day Nissan Leaf's specs were announced. 75 miles with an 8 hour recharge time is simply unreasonable. The Leaf isn't anything revolutionary except in trying to bridge the gap between golf cart and car. Tesla produces several pure electric vehicles that far outperform Leaf, before Leaf even hit the market. So it really didn't bring anything to the table except marginally lower prices for a high class market vehicle. I've heard it defended to the death that the Leaf works as a second commuter vehicle for the average day to day driving.  That's a fine premise, but if you have the money to buy a brand new, relatively expensive vehicle purely for the purpose of going to work and back, why not go upgrade to something better in the electric market, or go hybrid and ultimately save more money and more emissions by getting a vehicle that will only use electric in the day to day, but has the option of going gasoline in longer distance travel?

 When this first came out I lived about 85 miles from San Francisco, which was an 1 1/2 hour drive by normal vehicle, and a frequent destination. In the Leaf this minor day trip would require stopping half way, recharging for 8 hours, and then continuing to San Francisco, recharging again there, one could then make it half way back and recharge another 8 hours, making what would have been 3 hours total transit into 19 hours total transit. That's not a car. You could get to and from with a moped faster. 

holdeninpdx
holdeninpdx

This is all you need to know about EVs...and the President who is abetting them:

 

"The Chevy Volt, the plug-in car that has been plagued by

sluggish sales and mounting losses since General Motors rolled it out in

2010, has one deep-pocketed customer: the Pentagon.

The Department of Defense is planning to purchase 1,500 electric cars

including Volts as part of its effort to make the military more

environmentally friendly. But given the federal government’s bailout of

Chevy maker General Motors, President Obama’s praise of the Volt and the

car’s long-running problems, the federal purchase is likely to become

the latest controversy in the Volt’s short life.

Earlier this week, Reuters reported that GM is losing up to $49,000 on every Volt

driven out of the showroom. The report took GM’s huge investment in the

pioneering car and divided it by the meager sales to date and concluded

that each car costs the company nearly $90,000 – more than double the

sticker price.

 GM blasted the report, disputing the numbers and insisting that as

sales build, the initial costs will be recouped and the cost-per-car

will fall.

Those sales will be boosted at taxpayer expense. The Department of

Defense began buying Volts this summer as the Marine Corps Air Station

in Miramar, Calif., purchased two in July. Another 18 Volts will soon be

delivered to Joint Base Andrews in Maryland, where Air Force One is

based, according to military magazine Stars and Stripes.

The Obama administration has been among the Volt’s biggest backers

with the president vowing to “buy one and drive it myself … five years

from now when I’m not president anymore.”

But despite ultra-cheap lease deals and tax breaks of $7,500 for buyers, sales have still been moribund.

Such perks, however, have failed to drive consumers to GM car lots.

The vehicle has been forced to suspend production twice this year and

will again suspend production later this month after only 2,831 were

sold last month.

The General Services Administration bought 100 Volts in 2011 for various agencies."

Reuters

holdeninpdx
holdeninpdx

Electric cars, like the Leaf, are novelties, little else.  After 50 miles, it takes a day to recharge them, and unless one lives in areas which have WASTED MILLIONS OF DOLLARS in infrastructure to support a miniscule number of cars, they're useless.  GM reports it costs twice the price to produce each Volt it has sold and the number of sales consists mostly of Government agency fleet acquisitions.  The Prius, Camry, Fusion and Sonata hybrids are selling well, with little or no Government subsidies (some tax credits were available but nothing like what Volt buyers got/get).

In Denver, a Volt buyer gets a $7,500 Federal Income Tax Credit and up to $6,000 in State credits...and still, the lots are packed with them.  Even with Government Motors' MASSIVE marketing and financing arms, the Volt's biggest "customer base" is the Government.

It's a fallacy to think electric cars are more "green" than hybrid, diesel and hydrogen powered cars.  From where does the power to charge cars come?  From fossil fuel burning electric power plants!  Hydrogen cars, which Honda tested extensively in CA, are far more green and have 250 mile ranges between fill-ups--which take 3 MINUTES, not 16 HOURS.  The batteries in electric cars come from filthy-dirty Chinese plants and are NOT recyclable.

Why would anybody buy a Leaf or a Volt for $40,000 when hybrids can be had for $15,000 less and can be driven like conventional cars?  If the Volt were a Ford, it would have been scrapped prior to the first one coming off the assembly line, no matter the size of the Government incentive.

To put the anemic sales numbers of electric cars into perspective, ONE high volume Ford store will sell more F-150s in a year than EVERY SINGLE ELECTRIC CAR in AMERICA!  The Government should NOT play favorites in the marketplace...period...

llaumann
llaumann

What the article misses is not the failure of the LEAF, but I think, the intelligence of LEAF buyers. Why would anyone buy a 2011 or 2012 model year LEAF at this time, when the much improved 2013 LEAF will be available in a few months? The new 2013 boasts faster charging time, greater range, cheaper price, and it is made in America. It has a more efficient heater and an option for leather seats.  Is it really a mystery why sales have dropped precipitously?

ga
ga

We have a 2011 Leaf and love it.  I saw five others on the road today around our house in Marin County, California. The local dealership has none on the lot.

 I spent $21 for 5 gallons of gas for our gasoline car yesterday. That's about a single charge on the Leaf which costs me less than $2. 

I picked up my son at school, waited in the "car line" with the AC on, XM radio going with no guilt and nearly no cost.

Zeitgeist1970
Zeitgeist1970

Unless electric car roll-outs are supported by appropriate road infrastructure (blanket-coverage battery charging or swapping stations, see eg http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/worl... ) and accompanying institutional changes legislated by policy makers, mainstreamed market uptake will inevitably remain sluggish. What's lacking is not technological innovation but enlightened political will. It's as simple as that!

Fred2202350
Fred2202350

It seems to me that the Leaf's poor sales are more of an advertising failure than anything else. There are specific markets where a short range car that never needs gas would be the logical choice, but many areas where it would be totally impractical even as a 2nd car - where I live my new VW Jetta TDI's 40+ mpg in town is a much a much more logical choice. But I still am amazed that the Leaf WON its class in the Pike's Peak Hill Climb, and beat racing cars in classes above it (!) and nobody even knows it. Think about it; as the cars climbed toward 14,000 ft, the Leaf was the ONLY one which maintained it's full sea-level power rating. Nissan doesn't seem to know how to tap the market, niche though it is, for this car.

Josh
Josh

Sigh. And Yawn. That's all I can say, Mr. Tuttle. Yet another Leaf-bashing article based on nothing but one number and a reporter's opinion. How about interviewing a single Leaf owner to get an opinion on "range anxiety?" The truth is that any knowledgeable EV driver who can work Google Maps does not have this anxiety, because our worlds don't revolve around finding chargers in "the wild," we are comfortable with the 40-mile radius around our garages, where we know we always have a daily supply of fuel. Instead of jumping to the "it's a flop" conclusion based on admittedly slow and disappointing sales, a much more interesting article (and one you might actually have to practice some journalism for) would be finding out why the limited-range aspect of the Leaf is so hard for mainstream consumers to swallow. When 98 percent of most drivers' daily mileage can be done in a Leaf, and the majority of households in America have two cars (i.e. it's possible to have one EV for local driving, and a gas car for the other 2% of trips), the low sales number is most certainly a marketing problem for Nissan, not a failing of the car or the technology. Come on, Brad, give us an article with some sophistication, and with some actual Leaf-driver input.

Joanna Pineda
Joanna Pineda

My husband and I love our Nissan Leaf. We got it last November and think the car is fantastic. An all electric lifestyle is definitely not for everyone, but since we have short commutes, it's perfect for us. The low sales is probably due to the cost of the car, fear of being stranded, and long commutes. We are seeing more Nissan Leafs here in the Northern VA area, btw.

rickw4s
rickw4s

With their limited range, pure electrics cannot be one's only car.  But a two vehicle couple, where both have normal commutes, the an electric *could* be one of the cars.

As someone else suggested, one of the other forces making electrics "flops" is the charging infrastructure.  Here in California (where we're probably ahead of other areas), there aren't that many charging stations.  Some are free, but those tend to be occupied all day by people who work nearby.  Others charge by the hour, but at a price that's not attractive: the fuel cost per mile is very high.

In my opinion, stores and shopping centers should have ample charging stations, and supply 1/2 hour of free charge (as an incentive to shop there, and to replace the charge spent getting there).  And the chargers should charge a high tariff after the charger has been occuppied for more than a couple of hours (to encourage turnover).

Bruce Dp
Bruce Dp

As a person that reads many, many newswire items each and everyday covering plug-in vehicles of all types, I sum up this piece as a whole lot of useless blather.

Since when does the Time mag that goes for flash (fr ont co ver t eat su ckling) rather than actual journalism produce any article of any value. No, reading this piece is a true waste of time, and reaffirms how easy it is for advertising clients to have articles written for them with their skewed bias.

For those that do not want a plug-in vehicle, stick with a high mpg fuel car, and fund petrol profits.

For those that want freedom from that death-grip, sales reps from all dealers near me say sales are fine, and they are not concerned with bogus reports like this.

{brucedp.150m.com}

spaceneedleland
spaceneedleland

Really? You'd expect a typical fellow american to make logical, sound financial decisions inside a car dealership?! Now that would be epic. You are talking about the same people who think they can increase their yearly income by just using the credit card to smooth it over.  They are going to walk out of that dealership with an emotional spur of the moment decision.

Dare I admit i bought one of these things. It is so incredibly dirt cheap to drive that I can also have $0 in the checking account and not worry about the cost of a road trip to the ocean or running around aimlessly around town. I don't even have to pay the power bill on time. Completely removing over $300/mo in gas out of the equation has been quite helpful for us.  

DC fast charge has been a big help, but there needs to be more of it. And trust me, after 2 1/2 hours of kids in the back of the car in traffic, you will WANT to stop for 20 minutes to get a bite to eat. We did it anyway in the gas SUV we still own. The LEAF is actually our road trip vehicle. I'll pocket the $35 in gas and spend $2 instead.

I am also not sure what you guys consider a golf cart. Not aware of one that has 210 foot-lbs of torque at 0 RPM, goes 0-60 in about 7-8 seconds, and drives a 100 miles, seats 5 with cargo, and weighs in at 3500 lbs....but to be fair,  I haven't golfed in a while.

I am the smrt
I am the smrt

The car is too expensive. that is the problem. If it were 50 percent cheaper i think they would sell 50 times more...easily.

the only reason to buy now:

A. to support the movement of the electric car to help improve it so these companies can invent better batteries and have more money to build more charging stations

B. to be part of the movement of better air quality and a better environment for our kids future.

C. to be less dependable on these oil companies who who charge an arm and a leg for their liquid gold as well as the main cause of war.

I think if you have the moneyto buy an electric car (any one of them) it would be a better option to buy these for the sake of our people and our planet.

Elptique
Elptique

Thank you TIME for filtering my previous respectful, yet frank comment. That is called censure, not moderation.

Let's give it another try: poor article, does not account for the longer range 2013 battery pack, does not compare properly Nissan (relatively unknown model) to Toyota (well established, well known, well advertized model), does not account for the reality of driving (most people drive much less than 75 miles), does not account for the LEAF public (most of us use the LEAF as primary and an ICE as secondary car), does not account for the total cleanness of the car as most of us charge with PV, does not account for the fact that we get anxiety not out of range but out of a demented energy policy that is perfectly fine with occupying half the world to guarantee the flow of a polluting, old, inefficient, expensive, dangerous raw material.

So, again, I state my point: this is a illogical, poorly written article that serves only the interest of oil companies.

Matthew11
Matthew11

What a surprise, a car that is sold for nearly twice what it should be listed for is not selling well.  The market for an EV is big enough but not at this price point.  I can have almost any vehicle retrofitted as an EV with as good or better range as the leaf for 10k installed.  When considering I could get a good used chassis for as little as 1k, where is the benefit in buying this product.

Don't get me wrong, I think EV's are the way of the future, if I could afford a Mercedes S class, I would order a Tesla Model S instead, however, it's time to start allowing the real electric car companies into North America.  I was my 14k BYD motors car that has 2.5-4 times the range of the leaf and heck, I'll even pay 20k for it since I doubt the chinese government will subsidize the cost outside of China.

It disgusts me how Toyota and Nissan exploit the tax credits not to encourage consumers to buy these products, but instead pay more for them just because you are getting money back.  Electric motors are cheaper to build than their ICE counterparts but you would not know it by the pricetag.

Brian Bass
Brian Bass

The sole reason the Leafs aren't selling is because Nissan is not marketing them well.

Gary McCray
Gary McCray

Currently there isn't anything like enough dedicated infrastructure to handle not at home charging for all electrics.

Good to know that some infrastructure is going in, but for many of us more distant from such dedicated infra structure, home charging is the only real option leaving us with the round trip range of limited battery capability.

I'm sure it will get better as gas becomes scarcer and more expensive.

There are a few problems: 

Battery costs are particularly high but will go down as production goes up.

Energy density of 123 nano type Lithium cells is not likely to be greatly improved on, the latest have lots of charge discharge cycles and about as high a energy density as you could hope for without some real exotic technology that requires heating or cooling.

Newer Lithium technologies also permit much faster charging without degrading battery life, so additional infrastructure would make truly fast recharge stations feasible.

At home solar charging is feasible, but solar energy density just isn't high enough to make on car charging practically useful even with really exotic 20 percent efficient plus solar cells, which right now literally cost an arm and a leg.

Charging stations with really large arrays could offset power costs and in fact some of these exist in Germany and the rest of Europe.

If we could build cars the way we did in the 60's we could make them half the weight they are now, but all the safety and smog laws actually work against us now.

We made our cars safe enough to withstand severe impacts from many thousand pound vehicles, and we modified engine emissions also at the expense of weight.

As a result we have forgotten how to make a truly light car.

Most of even the small cars are at least a thousand pounds over weight.

If you really want to make an all electric work, every pound you can lose is further you go.

Modern carbon fiber and light weight composite and high strength formed aluminum technology could help a lot, but reevaluating safety specs for a lightweight vehicle world would also go a long way to making practical electrics more feasible.

Aerodynamics and reduced rolling friction are a continual ongoing development process.

Hydrogen will no doubt be used, but it comes either from natural gas or grid electricity and is not intrinsically an efficient extraction process.

So unless we go big time nuclear for grid electric, it is probably not feasible to produce large quantities of hydrogen for long term vehicular use.

In the end there is no choice, the necessary infrastucture must eventually be installed and more modern faster charging batteries will make local charge ups feasible if not optimal.

Blue-eyed Gal
Blue-eyed Gal

Apparently they've all been sold in my neighborhood, as I see them as often as I used to see Priuses tooling around 10 years ago. Which is to say: maybe once every few days. 

Priuses are now as ubiquitous in my part of the world as the Ford Taurus was in about 1990.

So, it's progress. It does take time to phase in a new technology. We're still on the "early adapter" phase of the Volt and Leaf, whereas hybrids are mainstream at this point.

Ten years ago, this pundit would've written that the Prius was a flop.

yanquetino
yanquetino

The number of vehicles SOLD is misleading without the number actually AVAILABLE. Here is that ratio to date for the EVs currently on the market in the U.S.:

http://bit.ly/TvheDM

You can see that the Nissan LEAF is actually holding its own fairly well.

Tutanka
Tutanka

I own a Volt and the range was one of the deal-breakers for the Leaf. I personally prefer the look of the Volt as well. For me, the Volt is capable of being an only car where as the Leaf can't be. I have come home from work and had 10 miles on my charge and gotten a call from a friend from out of town and I could still go out, I'd just burn a little gas. In the Leaf, I'd have to pass or have them come pick me up. If I risked my range in the Leaf, I could be 2-3 miles from the house with no juice and have to call a tow truck or a buddy with a tow strap. Pure EV won't take off until full charge times are 5-10 min. I hear ultra capacitors are in the works that are capable of that kind of recharge.

Oola Fandango
Oola Fandango

So, the Volt is not a failure?  The price of a Volt does not reflect the cost of the bailout of GM.   GM's shut down the assembly lines for the Volt because of poor sales in spite of the billions of dollars pumped into GM by the government.  This article's crap.  Romney 2012.

Bill Courtney
Bill Courtney

I'm a very happy Leaf owner (purchased June '12, now have 4K miles).  I bought it for a few reasons. 1) My commute is 20 miles each direction. 2) I carpool with my wife most days. 3) I would be saving over $125/mo in gas money.  That number includes the amount I spend on electricity to charge it.  I have no range-anxiety.  The car tells me exactly how far I can drive.  It adapts the range calculation to my driving style. When I know I will need to drive farther than my range allows, I take my hybrid.  No biggy. This car is not for everyone, true, but it is roomy, comfortable, and can beat most other cars off the line.  It has an incredible amount of power (pun intended).

sunrunner95
sunrunner95

Give us small engine diesel powered car,s and pick ups like the Europeans have,then watch sales shoot up

cgoldfinger
cgoldfinger

What is a flop is not the Leaf, but the intelligence of the American public.  We are headed for an environmental cliff, and it's mostly Americans who use all the energy and don't see the cliff.  

stidbow
stidbow

Obama should be forced to ride in a leaf or volt, everyone else should get a real car. I would not listen to the few who have one....listen to the Millions of people that don't!

freelance7
freelance7

It appears as if Nissan won’t get halfway to its 20,000-Leaf target for 2012, nor will it top last year’s mark of 9,679 units  - It won't get to 10,000, nor will it top last year's mark of 9,679 units.  OK.  I was going to buy a Leaf, buy I've ordered an electric Rimac  Concept_One.  0-60 in 2.8, 180 mph, a motor over each wheel, and made in Croatia of all places.

Ronald Edward
Ronald Edward

The company did not want the car to be a success so they priced it so high people refused to pay such a rediculas amount......  They wanted a failure so they could say " see, people don't want an electric car but we tried"....   Offer an electric car for under $20,000 and watch the sales go up!

Elptique
Elptique

 Another genuflecting, delirious, uninformed, illogical article from a class

of propaganda "journalists". For novices, there is no such a thing as range-anxiety.

It's a convenient lie of the Oil propagandists to scare off the curious and the willing.

People that choose and drive the Leaf know and work well within its specifications.

Not only, 75 miles are plenty for most people if they were not brain washed by

unrealistic commercials showing cars on empty roads and infinite horizons.

No, most people commute to work well within 75 miles and there are several LEAF

owners who commute 70 miles each way and are doing fine.

Having said the above, some numbers (mine): 25000 miles in 17 months. Never got stuck.

In two occasions I reverted to the infernal, eternal, interal combustion engine car

as I thought the range might not have been sufficient. Total savings in gas, $3600.

Charging the car on solar energy for free, PRICELESS. Literally.

Now your numbers Mr. Tuttle. You say the Prius is a giant compared to the Leaf. Agreed.

Then you say the Prius sold 6082 cars while the Leaf 4228. It seems to me the Leaf

is doing just fine. As an almost totally unknown car, with a stiff sticker price, with a limited

range, it is actually doing quite well when compare to the very well known an highly publicized

Prius.

Do you know what gives me anxiety? War gives me anxiety. Disappearing ice caps give me anxiety.

A world that can't shake an addition to a raw material gives me anxiety. A child with scared

eyes because a soldier points a gun at him an his father give me anxiety and makes me feel ashamed

that there are still articles and journalists with no moral fortitute that all they do is to genuflect

to the power of idious, evil, demented companies that have no care or interest in the beauty of our

land, soil, coast, people and moral values.

abunai
abunai

I leased a Volt for $375/month. Yes, the MSRP is high but with the mentioned incentive, the price is in line with a $32,000 car and the lease rates . Still not cheap but competitive when compared to similarly sized and equipped cars. For our household that drives around 40 miles per day with the Volt, the operating costs are extremely low because we achieve the equivalent of 95 miles per gallon which shaves off $170/month in energy cost compared to our previous 20 mpg car. This is our first car from a U.S. manufacturer in 20 years and we absolutely love it.

Elptique
Elptique

Another genuflecting, delirious, uninformed, illogical article from a class

of propaganda "journalists". For novices, there is no such a thing as range-anxiety.

It's a convenient lie of the Oil propagandists to scare off the curious and the willing.

People that choose and drive the Leaf know and work well within its specifications.

Not only, 75 miles are plenty for most people if they were not brain washed by

unrealistic commercials showing cars on empty roads and infinite horizons.

No, most people commute to work well within 75 miles and there are several LEAF

owners who commute 70 miles each way and are doing fine.

Having said the above, some numbers (mine): 25000 miles in 17 months. Never got stuck.

In two occasions I reverted to the infernal, eternal, interal combustion engine car

as I thought the range might not have been sufficient. Total savings in gas, $3600.

Charging the car on solar energy for free, PRICELESS. Literally.

Now your numbers Mr. Tuttle. You say the Prius is a giant compared to the Leaf. Agreed.

Then you say the Prius sold 6082 cars while the Leaf 4228. It seems to me the Leaf

is doing just fine. As an almost totally unknown car, with a stiff sticker price, with a limited

range, it is actually doing quite well when compare to the very well known an highly publicized

Prius.

Do you know what gives me anxiety? War gives me anxiety. Disappearing ice caps give me anxiety.

A world that can't shake an addition to a raw material gives me anxiety. A child with scared

eyes because a soldier points a gun at him an his father give me anxiety and makes me feel ashamed

that there are still articles and journalists with no moral fortitute that all they do is to genuflect

to the power of idious, evil, demented companies that have no care or interest in the beauty of our

land, soil, coast, people and moral values.

Elptique
Elptique

Another genuflecting, delirious, uninformed, illogical article from a class

of propaganda "journalists". For novices, there is no such a thing as range-anxiety.

It's a convenient lie of the Oil propagandists to scare off the curious and the willing.

People that choose and drive the Leaf know and work well within its specifications.

Not only, 75 miles are plenty for most people if they were not brain washed by

unrealistic commercials showing cars on empty roads and infinite horizons.

No, most people commute to work well within 75 miles and there are several LEAF

owners who commute 70 miles each way and are doing fine.

Having said the above, some numbers (mine): 25000 miles in 17 months. Never got stuck.

In two occasions I reverted to the infernal, eternal, interal combustion engine car

as I thought the range might not have been sufficient. Total savings in gas, $3600.

Charging the car on solar energy for free, PRICELESS. Literally.

Now your numbers Mr. Tuttle. You say the Prius is a giant compared to the Leaf. Agreed.

Then you say the Prius sold 6082 cars while the Leaf 4228. It seems to me the Leaf

is doing just fine. As an almost totally unknown car, with a stiff sticker price, with a limited

range, it is actually doing quite well when compare to the very well known an highly publicized

Prius.

Do you know what gives me anxiety? War gives me anxiety. Disappearing ice caps give me anxiety.

A world that can't shake an addition to a raw material gives me anxiety. A child with scared

eyes because a soldier points a gun at him an his father give me anxiety and makes me feel ashamed

that there are still articles and journalists with no moral fortitute that all they do is to genuflect

to the power of idious, evil, demented companies that have no care or interest in the beauty of our

land, soil, coast, people and moral values.

Michael Scinta
Michael Scinta

I really think calling it a "flop" is unfair. As others have said, this is a "First Effort" and a pretty good one at that. Infrastructure is slowly coming into place, cars will get better. Heck the car itself is good, just needs some extra range. But ahh...the power of the internet. The author could have researched a bit and found out that the 2013 model is rumored to launch with more range, more efficient heater, and possibly a lower price tag. Time will produce better cars as folks demand them and technology improves. 

Not sure why all the hate towards electric cars. If anything, its a pretty good thing for our economy. Why not just energy generated here vs. oil from countries, that candidly, don't really love us. Even if powering this car with all coal electricity, its still been reported to be cleaner than a tailpipe. Easier to control 100 power plants vs. 10 million cars is various states of good/bad working order. 

Something should also be said for what true luxury is or can be. A car that is silent at idle and whisper quiet when accelerating vs. vibrations in a steering wheel from gas engines, endless shifting 6, 7, 8 speed transmissions, and constant maintenance: Oil, Belts, Tranny fluid, radiators fluid, tune ups, exhaust leaks, faster brake wear (regenerative braking on hybrids and electric cars puts that engergy back into a battery vs. using the brakes 100% for stopping).

Things to think about.

Elptique
Elptique

Another genuflecting, delirious, uninformed, illogical article from a class

of propaganda "journalists". For novices, there is no such a thing as range-anxiety.

It's a convenient lie of the Oil propagandists to scare off the curious and the willing.

People that choose and drive the Leaf know and work well within its specifications.

Not only, 75 miles are plenty for most people if they were not brain washed by

unrealistic commercials showing cars on empty roads and infinite horizons.

No, most people commute to work well within 75 miles and there are several LEAF

owners who commute 70 miles each way and are doing fine.

Having said the above, some numbers (mine): 25000 miles in 17 months. Never got stuck.

In two occasions I reverted to the infernal, eternal, interal combustion engine car

as I thought the range might not have been sufficient. Total savings in gas, $3600.

Charging the car on solar energy for free, PRICELESS. Literally.

Now your numbers Mr. Tuttle. You say the Prius is a giant compared to the Leaf. Agreed.

Then you say the Prius sold 6082 cars while the Leaf 4228. It seems to me the Leaf

is doing just fine. As an almost totally unknown car, with a stiff sticker price, with a limited

range, it is actually doing quite well when compare to the very well known an highly publicized

Prius.

Do you know what gives me anxiety? War gives me anxiety. Disappearing ice caps give me anxiety.

A world that can't shake an addition to a raw material gives me anxiety. A child with scared

eyes because a soldier points a gun at him an his father give me anxiety and makes me feel ashamed

that there are still articles and journalists with no moral fortitute that all they do is to genuflect

to the power of idious, evil, demented companies that have no care or interest in the beauty of our

land, soil, coast, people and moral values.

Alex Santos
Alex Santos

I think more people will buy electric cars in general once more charge stations are set up. When the first gas powered automobile came out people also had to worry about not having gas to return home. If charging stations pop up and the price of the electric cars come down they will be very popular. I know I have one on my wish list. The Tesla Model S seems to be doing well.

Rick
Rick

ROFLMAO!   This is the "future" that Obama wants to waste taxpayer money pursuing!   Sounds like the same outcome as Obama's  jobs plans, healthcare schemes, and every other failure!!!!

watash60
watash60

all the Eco-wackos should have one - whats up.....

Buy Steroids
Buy Steroids

I see plenty of them on the roads shame they hadn't been cheaper.

Frank4434rfr
Frank4434rfr

They need to make a $5000.00 electric car with no bells and whistles for people to commute with. No one is going to be limited to car that goes 100 miles per day but someone looking for cheap gas free car to go to and from work. 

That way they can afford to have both electric and gas. You can forget someone buying a 40 thousand dollar car that goes 100 miles before it has to charge for 6 hours. 

InformNow
InformNow

Take away US government purchases of Chevy Volt, what are its sales numbers? Two words: Crony Capitalism! Two more words: Epic Fail!

mugzee44
mugzee44

Nissan's engineering is very sloppy. fast cars but sloppily put together.

Tom Wittmann
Tom Wittmann

People like some tea-baggers posting here you only exist in the US ,which ship the jobs and production to Japan because they do not like OBAMA or the TARP.

 

Compare this with JAPAN, where only 2$ of all vehicle are imported, even if upto 30% cheaper at equal value, because they are patriots

 

Factually, Japanese vehicles are supported bt a Super-Tarp, as in addition of the patriotism of the consumers, the courageous ones buying an imported car are ostracized, fired by many employers (including the Government), which enables the local manufacturers as NISSAN sell the products to outrageous prices

Elp Tique
Elp Tique

Another genuflecting, delirious, uninformed, illogical article from a class

of propaganda "journalists". For novices, there is no such a thing as range-anxiety.

It's a convenient lie of the Oil propagandists to scare off the curious and the willing.

People that choose and drive the Leaf know and work well within its specifications.

Not only, 75 miles are plenty for most people if they were not brain washed by

unrealistic commercials showing cars on empty roads and infinite horizons.

No, most people commute to work well within 75 miles and there are several LEAF

owners who commute 70 miles each way and are doing fine.

Having said the above, some numbers (mine): 25000 miles in 17 months. Never got stuck.

In two occasions I reverted to the infernal, eternal, interal combustion engine car

as I thought the range might not have been sufficient. Total savings in gas, $3600.

Charging the car on solar energy for free, PRICELESS. Literally.

Now your numbers Mr. Tuttle. You say the Prius is a giant compared to the Leaf. Agreed.

Then you say the Prius sold 6082 cars while the Leaf 4228. It seems to me the Leaf

is doing just fine. As an almost totally unknown car, with a stiff sticker price, with a limited

range, it is actually doing quite well when compare to the very well known an highly publicized

Prius.

Do you know what gives me anxiety? War gives me anxiety. Disappearing ice caps give me anxiety.

A world that can't shake an addition to a raw material gives me anxiety. A child with scared

eyes because a soldier points a gun at him an his father give me anxiety and makes me feel ashamed

that there are still articles and journalists with no moral fortitute that all they do is to genuflect

to the power of idious, evil, demented companies that have no care or interest in the beauty of our

land, soil, coast, people and moral values.

Elp Tique
Elp Tique

Another genuflecting, delirious, uninformed, illogical article from a class

of propaganda "journalists". For novices, there is no such a thing as range-anxiety.

It's a convenient lie of the Oil propagandists to scare off the curious and the willing.

People that choose and drive the Leaf know and work well within its specifications.

Not only, 75 miles are plenty for most people if they were not brain washed by

unrealistic commercials showing cars on empty roads and infinite horizons.

No, most people commute to work well within 75 miles and there are several LEAF

owners who commute 70 miles each way and are doing fine.

Having said the above, some numbers (mine): 25000 miles in 17 months. Never got stuck.

In two occasions I reverted to the infernal, eternal, interal combustion engine car

as I thought the range might not have been sufficient. Total savings in gas, $3600.

Charging the car on solar energy for free, PRICELESS. Literally.

Now your numbers Mr. Tuttle. You say the Prius is a giant compared to the Leaf. Agreed.

Then you say the Prius sold 6082 cars while the Leaf 4228. It seems to me the Leaf

is doing just fine. As an almost totally unknown car, with a stiff sticker price, with a limited

range, it is actually doing quite well when compare to the very well known an highly publicized

Prius.

Do you know what gives me anxiety? War gives me anxiety. Disappearing ice caps give me anxiety.

A world that can't shake an addition to a raw material gives me anxiety. A child with scared

eyes because a soldier points a gun at him an his father give me anxiety and makes me feel ashamed

that there are still articles and journalists with no moral fortitute that all they do is to genuflect

to the power of idious, evil, demented companies that have no care or interest in the beauty of our

land, soil, coast, people and moral values.

Tom Wittmann
Tom Wittmann

Anybody with half a brain told well in advance that the LEAF was a misconcept, only motivated by the will to provide a alternative to the VOLT

Only the pathologic US admirer of Japanese cars made favorable noises, but finally accepted the reality

The LEAF sales a bit better in Japan, where people is less long range driving as in the US, but the price there is nearly the double than in the US, even if the vehicle is imported from Japan. This shows that the Price in the US as a dumping one, far below the cost, and anyway does not sell.

Christopher Colmus
Christopher Colmus

they need smaller interchangeable batteries, like a gas station. You could switch for new cells like filling up at the pump.