Poll: Does Tech Help or Hurt Workplace Productivity?

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There is little doubt that technology has, in many ways, made us more productive at work. But an increasing number of experts are asking whether our business culture of email and instant messaging and 24/7 connectivity is making it hard to concentrate on a single task, undermining our ability to address big picture issues and, ultimately, hurting our productivity. Please tell us where you come down on this question by participating in the following (thoroughly unscientific) poll.

Your answers will inform the conversation during a live “Google Hangout” on the subject — which can be seen live on Wednesday, August 15, at 12:30 E.T. — and will also help us shape TIME’s future coverage on the role of technology in the workplace.

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7 comments
Erich_Lagasse
Erich_Lagasse

If employees are taught to use the IM only for job related issues, using it can help productivity. There are, however, a few things employees must consider to make the most of using the IM at work. We posted a piece http://academy.justjobs.com/do... that discusses this in detail. - Erich

Drazen Loncaric
Drazen Loncaric

Tech has made me enormously productive, but only since I started working for myself and can control and use it as appropriate to the current situation.  When I was working in the corporate rat race, it had the opposite effect.   

The problem is not tech, it is the social and political forces in the modern corporate workplace that simply use tech to more efficiently create even larger and more unwieldy bureaucracies.

Little_Jack
Little_Jack

Does anyone else see the irony in asking the question "Does tech help of hurt workplace productivity?" and then inviting people to watch a high tech online Google Hangout during the middle of a workday?

LoudRambler
LoudRambler

Nah, I don't.

 People used to play Solitaire in the 90es, Tetris in the 80es and had to do a lot more routine stuff in the 70es.

 If anything, this article is faster than a typical game of Tetris.

And let's not forget the 20es, when people routinely were boozing at work.

Julia Williams
Julia Williams

I wouldn't say tech is the biggest issue in the modern business world. Although it might take away the personal attention given to each person, emailing has become a form that allows people to "cold-call" in a much more efficient method. I would argue that emailing is almost better for the modern enterprise except for the fact that it might diminish one's overall standard of living by always being on call. With that being said, I would highly recommend reading this article on the development and improvement of one's emails.

http://www.consultingcafe.com/...

Julia
Julia

I wouldn't say tech is the biggest issue in the modern business world. Although it might take away the personal attention given to each person, emailing has become a form that allows people to "cold-call" in a much more efficient method. I would argue that emailing is almost better for the modern enterprise except for the fact that it might diminish one's overall standard of living by always being on call. With that being said, I would highly recommend reading this article on the development and improvement of one's emails.

http://www.consultingcafe.com/...

laude05
laude05

The real problem is not tech (although it may contribute), the real problem is cutting the time per task beyond the true minimum. For too many managers and first line supervisors their time is fully occupied with current real time tasks. At first glance this seems like a good thing, no waisted time. But ~ and it's a huge but, that time used to be spent looking at current operations and finding better methods. In other places in the company it used to be spent looking at ways to improve the product or service. Almost every job would benefit from some put your feet up and just think time.